Arquivos de Categoria: Técnica Cirúrgica

Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery


With the introduction of laparoscopic colectomy nearly 20 years ago, a relatively slow adoption of laparoscopic colorectal surgery into surgical practice has taken place. It is estimated that 10% to 25% of all colorectal resections are performed utilizing laparoscopy. The persistent steep learning curve, the lack of high-volume colorectal surgery by general surgeons (who perform the bulk of colonic resection in the United States), and the modest advantages reported are but a few of the reasons that the percentage of laparoscopic colorectal procedures has not dramatically risen. With the publication of several large, prospective randomized trials for colon cancer, along with the interest in single-port surgery and natural orifice surgery, there appears to be a renewed interest in minimally invasive procedures for the colon and rectum. This chapter will provide an overview of these issues and offer a current assessment of the common diseases to which minimally invasive techniques have been applied.

Learning Curve

Numerous previous studies have evaluated the learning curve involved in laparoscopic colectomy. It is estimated by conventional laparoscopic techniques that the learning curve for laparoscopic colectomy is at least 20 cases but more likely 50 cases. The need to work in multiple quadrants of the abdomen, the need for a skilled laparoscopic assistant, and the lack of yearly volume has kept the learning curve relatively steep. The surgeon may also need to work in reverse angles to the camera. All of these combined add to the complexity of the procedure and result in the need to perform a number of cases before the surgeon and surgical team become proficient. More recent publications have suggested the learning curve is more than 20 cases. In a prospective randomized study of colorectal cancer in the United Kingdom, the CLASICC trial, surgeons had to perform at least 20 laparoscopic resections before they were allowed to enter the study. The study began in July 1996 and was completed in July 2002. Despite the surgeons’ prior experience, the rate of conversion dropped from 38% to 16% over the course of the study, suggesting that a minimum of 20 cases may not be enough to overcome the learning curve. In the COLOR trial from Europe, another prospective randomized study for colon cancer that required a prerequisite experience in laparoscopic colon resection before surgeons could enter patients in the study, surgeon and hospital volume were directly related to a number of operative and postoperative outcomes. The median operative time for high-volume hospitals (>10 cases/year) was 188 minutes, compared to 241 minutes for low-volume hospitals (<5 cases/year); likewise, conversion rates were 9% versus 24% for the two groups. High-volume groups also had more lymph nodes in the resected specimens, fewer complications, and shortened hospital stays. These two relatively recent multicenter studies suggest that the learning curve is clearly greater than 20 cases and that surgeons need to perform a minimum yearly number of procedures to maintain their skills.

Outcomes

There may not be another area in recent surgical history that has been more heavily scrutinized than laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The plethora of accumulated data allows a careful assessment of all outcome measures for nearly every colorectal disease and procedure. In comparison to conventional colorectal surgery, the benefits of laparoscopy for colorectal procedures compared to open techniques include a reduction in postoperative ileus, postoperative pain, and a concomitant reduction in the need for analgesics; an earlier tolerance of diet; a shortened hospital stay; a quicker resumption of normal activities; improved cosmesis; and possibly preservation of immune function. This is offset by a prolongation in operative time, the cost of laparoscopic equipment, and the learning curve for these technically challenging procedures. When reporting the outcomes of laparoscopic colectomy, a natural selection bias applies when comparing conventional and laparoscopic cases. The most complex cases are generally not suitable for a laparoscopic approach and therefore are performed via an open approach. Also, in many series the results of the successfully completed laparoscopic cases are compared to conventional cases, and the cases converted from a laparoscopic to a conventional procedure may be analyzed separately. Few studies, with the exception of the larger prospective randomized studies, leave the converted cases in the laparoscopic group as part of the “intention to treat” laparoscopic group. This clearly introduces selection bias.

Although the results of prospective randomized trials are available for almost every disease process requiring colorectal resection, the majority of studies of laparoscopic colectomy are retrospective case-control series or noncomparative reports. The conclusions regarding patient outcomes must therefore come from the repetitiveness of the results rather than the superiority of the study design. For any one study, the evidence may be weak; but collectively, because of the reproducibility of results by a large number of institutions, even with different operative techniques and postoperative management parameters, the preponderance of evidence favors a minimally invasive approach with respect to postoperative outcomes.

 Operative Time

Nearly all the comparative studies provide information regarding operative times. The definition of the operative time may vary with each series, and there may be different groups of surgeons performing the laparoscopic and conventional procedures. With the exception of a few reports, nearly all studies demonstrated a prolonged operative time associated with laparoscopic procedures. In prospective randomized trials, the procedure was roughly 40 to 60 minutes longer in the laparoscopic groups. As the surgeon and team gain experience with laparoscopic colectomy, the operating times do reliably fall, but rarely do they return to the comparable time for a conventional approach.

 Return of Bowel Activity and Resumption of Diet

Reduction in postoperative ileus is one of the proposed major advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Nearly all of the retrospective and prospective studies comparing open and laparoscopic colectomy have shown a statistically significant reduction in the time to passage of flatus and stool. Most series demonstrate a 1- to 2-day advantage for the laparoscopic group. Whether the reduction of ileus relates to less bowel manipulation or less intestinal exposure to air during minimally invasive surgery remains unknown. With the reduction in postoperative ileus, the tolerance by the patient of both liquids and solid foods is quicker following laparoscopic resection. The time to resumption of diet varies from 2 days to 7 days, but in the majority of comparative studies, this is still 1 to 2 days sooner than in patients undergoing conventional surgery. Again, the physician and patient were not blinded in nearly all studies, which may have altered patient expectations. However, the overwhelming reproducible data reported in both retrospective and prospective studies of laparoscopic procedures does likely favor a reduction of postoperative ileus and tolerance of liquid and solid diets.

 Postoperative Pain

To measure postoperative pain, a variety of assessments have been performed to demonstrate a significant reduction in pain following minimally invasive surgery; some studies utilize an analog pain scale, and others measure narcotic requirements. Physician bias and psychologic conditioning of patients may interfere with the evaluation of postoperative pain. There are also cultural variations in the response to pain. Three of the early prospective randomized trials have evaluated pain postoperatively, and all three have found a reduction in narcotic requirements in patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy. In the COST study, the need both for intravenous and oral analgesics was less in patients undergoing successfully completed laparoscopic resections. Numerous other nonrandomized studies have shown a reduction in postoperative pain and narcotic usage.

 Length of Stay

The quicker resolution of ileus, earlier resumption of diet, and reduced postoperative pain has resulted in a shortened length of stay for patients after laparoscopic resection when compared to traditional procedures. Recovery after conventional surgery has also been shortened, but in the absence of minimally invasive techniques, it would seem unlikely that the length of stay could be further reduced. In nearly all comparative studies, the length of hospitalization was 1 to 6 days less for the laparoscopic group. Although psychological conditioning of the patient cannot be helped and likely has a desirable effect, the benefits of minimally invasive procedures on the overall length of stay cannot be discounted. The benefit, however, is more likely a 1 to 2 day advantage only. The more recent introduction of clinical pathways, both in conventional and laparoscopic surgery, has also narrowed the gap but appears to be more reliable in patients undergoing a minimally invasive approach.

 Hospital Costs

One of the disadvantages of laparoscopy is the higher cost related to longer operative times and increased expenditures in disposable equipment. Whether the total cost of the hospitalization (operative and hospital costs) is higher following laparoscopic colectomy is debatable. A case-control study from the Mayo Clinic looked at total costs following laparoscopic and open ileocolic resection for Crohn’s disease (CD). In this study, 66 patients underwent laparoscopic or conventional ileocolic resection and were well matched. Patients in the laparoscopic group had less postoperative pain, tolerated a regular diet 1 to 2 days sooner, and had a shorter length of stay (4 vs. 7 days). In the cost analysis, despite higher operative costs, the overall mean cost was $3273 less in the laparoscopic group. The procedures were performed by different groups of surgeons at the institution, and although the surgeons may have introduced biases, this study was undertaken during the current era of cost containment, in which all physicians are encouraged to reduce hospital stays. The results are similar for elective sigmoid diverticular resection with a mean cost savings of $700 to $800. Clearly, if operative times and equipment expenditure are minimized, the overall cost of a laparoscopic resection should not exceed a conventional approach.

Tratamento Laparoscópica da DIVERTICULITE AGUDA


O aumento da prevalência de doença diverticular fez o seu adequado manuseio mais um assunto de debate constante. Especialmente para os casos de diverticulite, progresso considerável tem sido feito em termos de diagnóstico e tratamento. Diagnóstico apropriado em TC e técnicas intervencionistas são agora amplamente disponíveis, bem como agentes antimicrobianos eficazes. Finalmente, como a ressecção cirúrgica do cólon envolvido é a única maneira de erradicar definitivamente essa condição, a colectomia eletiva laparoscópica surgiu como uma opção segura e interessante entre as opções de tratamento. Embora tenha sido recentemente contestada sobre a sua progressão, a história natural da diverticulite é assumida como sendo a de recorrência ao longo do tempo, pelo menos, em um terço dos pacientes. O medo das complicações desta doença benigna e prevalente tem motivado sociedades médicas e cirúrgicas para produzir orientações e consensos sobre o assunto. A mortalidade geralmente vem de sepse recorrente e/ou operações de emergência para casos mais complicados. Como resultado, o procedimento cirúrgico mais realizado, a sigmoidectomia eletiva, é normalmente indicada para todos os casos complicados e muitos dos não-complicados. A abordagem laparoscópica para a colectomia esquerda tem evoluído e condições seguras são oferecidas aos pacientes, quando realizado por cirurgiões experientes em laparoscopia.

Retromuscular Prefascial Mesh Hernia Repair (Jean RIVES – René STOPPA)

Rives-Stoppa

An incisional hernia is usually defined as a chronic postoperative defect of the abdominal wall through which intra-abdominal viscera protrude. Progress in surgical techniques, even with laparoscopic surgery, has not led to the elimination of incisional hernias. On the contrary, the incidence of this complication seems to be increasing as more major and lengthy operations are being performed, especially in elderly patients with concomitant organic disease. The incidence of this condition has been reported to be as high as 11% of all laparotomies. Surgical repair is difficult in the patient with a large abdominal wall defect, especially if the herniated viscera has “lost its right of domain” in the abdominal cavity. It must be remembered that surgical repair of an incisional hernia is not the same thing as closure of a laparotomy. Weakening of the abdominal wall and the consequences of decreased abdominal pressure on diaphragmatic mobility and respiratory function must also be considered. Placement of a prosthetic mesh is essential because without mesh, the recurrence rate is prohibitive, varying from 30% to 60%.  The  which is the subject of this article, was popularized by Jean Rives and has been used in our department since 1966.


RIVES_STOPPA_HERNIA_REPAIR

BILIARY-ENTERIC ANASTOMOSIS



Imagem

The operative conduct of the biliary-enteric anastomosis centers around three technical steps: 1) identification of healthy bile duct mucosa proximal to the site of obstruction; 2) preparation of a segment of alimentary tract, most often a Roux-en-Y jejunal limb; and 3) construction of a direct mucosa-to-mucosa anastomosis between these two. Selection of the proper anastomosis is dictated by the indication for biliary decompression and the anatomic location of the biliary obstruction. A right subcostal incision with or without an upper midline extension or left subcostal extension provides adequate exposure for construction of the biliary-enteric anastomosis. Use of retractors capable of upward elevation and cephalad retraction of the costal edges are quite valuable for optimizing visual exposure of the relevant hilar anatomy.

Imagem
Division of the ligamentum teres and mobilization of the falciform ligament off the anterior surface of the liver also facilitate operative exposure; anterocephalad retraction of the ligamentum teres and division of the bridge of tissue overlying the umbilical fissure are critical for optimal visualization of the vascular inflow and biliary drainage of segments II, III, and IV. Cholecystectomy also exposes the cystic plate, which runs in continuity with the hilar plate. Lowering of the hilar plate permits exposure of the left hepatic duct as it courses along the base of segment IVb. In cases of unilateral hepatic atrophy as a result of long-standing biliary obstruction or preoperative portal vein embolization, it is critical to understand that the normal anatomic relationships of the portal structures are altered. In the more common circumstance of  right-sided atrophy, the portal and hilar structures are rotated posteriorly and to the right; as a result, the portal vein, which is typically most posterior, is often encountered first; meticulous dissection is necessary to identify the common bile duct and hepatic duct deep within the porta hepatis.

BILIARY-ENTERIC ANASTOMOSIS_THECNICAL ASPECTS

Lesão de Vias Biliares na Colecistectomia: Prevenção e Tratamento



A via laparoscópica tem sido reconhecida como padrão de excelência para a colecistectomias. Phillipe Mouret foi quem primeiro a realizou em 1987, mas outros procedimentos já haviam sido realizados por laparoscopia e foram descritos por ginecologistas. Desenvolvida no final da década de 80 e início dos anos 90, a videolaparoscopia mudou os conceitos de acesso cirúrgico e campo operatório, introduzindo a concepção de “cirurgia minimamente invasiva”.A colecistectomia é um dos procedimentos cirúrgicos mais realizados no mundo. Com o advento da videolaparoscopia, tornou-se uma cirurgia menos traumática, mais estética, com períodos mais curtos de internação. Em contrapartida, observou-se o aumento da incidência de lesões de via biliar extra-hepática quando comparado ao procedimento aberto, fato preocupante devido à morbidade elevada desse tipo de lesão, cuja mortalidade não é desprezível.

Safe Surgery Save Lives

Evento Adverso (EA) é definido de acordo com a International Classification for Patient Safety proposta pela World Alliance for Patient Safety da Organização Mundial de Saúde (OMS) como incidente que resulta em dano (harm) ao paciente. Incidente definido como evento ou circunstância que poderia ter causado ou que resultou desnecessariamente em dano ao paciente e evento como algo que acontece com ou envolve o paciente. Os eventos adversos (EAs) têm estimativa de ocorrência em 4 a 16% de todos os pacientes hospitalizados, sendo que mais de metade nos cuidados cirúrgicos, dos quais acima de 50% são evitáveis. A ocorrência de EAs é considerada um problemade importância internacional sendo crescente o envolvimento de pesquisadores,profissionais de saúde e gestores de saúde na avaliação de EAs e inúmeras as instituições,redes de relacionamento e websites referentes ao tema.

Em 2004, expressando a preocupação mundial com a segurança de pacientes, foi  criada pela OMS a World Alliance for Patient Safety tendo como elemento central a formulação do Global Patient Safety Challenge, que engloba temas representativos dos principais aspectos dos riscos relacionados com a assistência à saúde, considerados relevantes para os países membros da OMS. O primeiro tema selecionado foi infecção associada à prestação de serviço em saúde, seguido de segurança dos cuidados cirúrgicos,tendo como objetivo prevenir erros, evitar danos e salvar vidas. O número de cirurgias de maior porte realizadas anualmente no mundo foi estimado pela OMS em 234 milhões, o que corresponde a uma cirurgia para cada 25 pessoas.

Cirurgia de maior porte inclui qualquer procedimento realizado na sala de cirurgia envolvendo incisão, excisão, manipulação, ou sutura de tecido que geralmente requer anestesia geral ou regional, ou sedação profunda para controlar a dor. Em países industrializados complicações ocorrem em 3 – 16% dos procedimentos cirúrgicos realizados em pacientes internados, com taxa de mortalidade de 0,4 – 0,8%. Estudos realizados em países em desenvolvimento estimam uma taxa de mortalidade de 5 a 10% em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia de maior porte. A segurança em cirurgia emerge como importante preocupação para a saúde pública global. Cirurgia é um dos mais complexos e caros serviços prestados pelos sistemas de saúde.

Nos países em desenvolvimento , o mau estado da infraestrutura e dos equipamentos; os problemas quanto ao suprimento e à qualidade de medicamentos e de material médico-cirúrgico; as falhas na gestão da organização e no controle de infecção; o desempenho insatisfatório dos profissionais devido à baixa motivação ou à deficiência na capacitação técnica; as falhas no correto diagnóstico pré-operatório; as deficiências na consulta pré-anestésica, e o subfinanciamento dos custos operacionais dos serviços de saúde, tornam a probabilidade de ocorrência de eventos adversos muito maior do que em países industrializados.

Veja alguns dados:

§4% pacientes sofrem algum tipo de dano no Hospital
§70% dos eventos adversos provocam uma incapacidade temporal
§14% dos incidentes são mortais
§60% são evitáveis

World Alliance for Patient Safety : forward programme. World Health Organization 2004, apud: Harvard Medical Practice Study in 1991

Eventos Adversos na Clínica Cirúrgica


EVENTOS ADVERSOS # COMPLICAÇÕES


O termo Evento Adverso (EA) cirúrgico é relativamente novo, mas o conceito de monitoramento dos resultados cirúrgicos, incluindo complicações pós-operatórias é muito antigo, havendo referência a sistemas de coleta de informações hospitalares existentes em 1732. Estatísticas vitais existem na Grã-Bretanha desde 1838. Em 1850 foi estabelecida a associação entre transmissão de infecção e a higiene da mão e em 1854 destacados os riscos aos pacientes relacionados com a má higiene nos hospitais. Em 1910, Ernest Codman apontou a necessidade de avaliação rotineira dos resultados negativos em cirurgias para a melhoria da qualidade da assistência. Nos anos 90 do século passado, continuou a expansão do interesse no campo de erros e danos relacionados com a assistência à saúde, porém com mudança no foco daspesquisas, que inicialmente buscavam estimar a frequência e natureza dos EAs em instituições e mais recentemente uma ênfase dirigida a como lidar melhor com o problema e uma crescente concordância com uma abordagem sistêmica ou organizacional.


EAs cirúrgicos contribuem significativamente para a morbidade pós-operatória, sendo sua avaliação e monitoramento frequentemente imprecisos e com validade incerta. Dada a tendência de redução do tempo de permanência hospitalar e o aumento no uso de  técnicas cirúrgicas inovadoras, especialmente minimamente invasivas e os procedimentos endoscópicos, a avaliação e o monitoramento eficiente dos eventos adversos cirúrgicos tornam-se cruciais. Alguns atributos comuns foram identificados em recente revisão de eventos adversos : EAs são desfavoráveis, indesejáveis e prejudiciais, têm impacto sobre o paciente e estão associados a um processo da assistência à saúde, mais do que a um processo natural de doenças. Estudos sobre eventos adversos têm demonstrado a complexidade de sua análise devido à variabilidade dos sistemas de registro e a extensa gama de definições na literatura científica para complicações pós-operatórias.

As complicações pós-operatórias resultam da interação de fatores dependentes do paciente, de sua enfermidade e da atenção à saúde recebida. O estudo dos EAs cirúrgicos tem especial relevância por sua frequência, porque em parte são atribuíveis a deficiências na atenção à saúde, pelo impacto considerável sobre a saúde dos pacientes, pela repercussão econômica no gasto social e sanitário e por constituir um instrumento de avaliação da qualidade da assistência. Os eventos adversos de maior interesse à saúde pública são os evitáveis, suscetíveis a intervenções dirigidas à sua prevenção. Os eventos adversos cirúrgicos estão relacionados com acidentes intra-operatórios cirúrgicos ou anestésicos, com complicações pós-operatórias imediatas ou tardias e com o fracasso da intervenção cirúrgica.

Os EAs cirúrgicos foram objeto de estudos realizados nos EUA , Austrália e Espanha . No estudo sobre EAs cirúrgicos em hospitais de Colorado e Utah (EUA) foi calculada a taxa de incidência de 1,9% para o total de pacientes internados. Dentre os pacientes submetidos à cirurgia e nos casos de parto a taxa de incidência de EAs cirúrgicos foi de 3,0%, sendo 54% considerados evitáveis. Foi estimado que 5,6% dos EAs cirúrgicos resultaram em óbito. No estudo para determinar a taxa de EAs em pacientes cirúrgicos na Austrália , a prevalência de internações cirúrgicas associadas com um EA foi calculada em 21,9%. Quanto à prevenção, foram classificados como altamente evitáveis 47,6% dos EAs, pouco evitáveis 31,4% e 20,8% não evitáveis.

Foi realizado um estudo para descrever os eventos adversos em cirurgias de parede abdominal e analisar as associações entre os resultados e determinadas características dospacientes, em um serviço de cirurgia geral em Valencia, Espanha . Complicações foram identificadas em 16,32% dos pacientes. A relevância da questão da segurança em cirurgia no Brasil pode ser evidenciada pelos resultados do estudo de Mendes et al. (2009) , especialmente se considerarmos o volume de internações relacionadas com cirurgia ocorridas no país no ano de 2003, cerca de três milhões, ano de referência do estudo mencionado . Além disso, poucos hospitais brasileiros cumprem a legislação sanitária para o licenciamento de estabelecimentos hospitalares.

Dados oriundos do Conselho Regional de Medicina do Estado de São Paulo, referentes à inspeção de 743 hospitais realizadas no ano de 2003, demonstram que 52,5% apresentaram condições físicas inadequadas, em desacordo com a legislação sanitária. Deve ainda ser destacado que os hospitais de pequeno porte, ou seja, com até cinquenta leitos, representam 62% dos estabelecimentos hospitalares e 18% dos leitos existentes no sistema de saúde brasileiro. Esses hospitais estão distribuídos principalmente em municípios de pequeno porte interioranos, são de baixa complexidade e densidade tecnológica, apresentam taxa de ocupação baixa (32,8%) e 89% possuem sala de cirurgia.

O CIRURGIÃO (POEMA)

O CIRURGIÃO

Um corpo inerte aguarda sobre a mesa
Naquele palco despido de alegria.

O artista das obras efêmeras se apresenta.
A opereta começa, ausente de melodia
E o mascarado mudo trabalha com presteza.

Sempre começa com esperança e só términa com certeza.

Se uma vida prolonga, a outra vai-se escapando.

E nem sempre do mundo o aplauso conquistando
Assim segue o artista da obra traiçoeira e conquistas passageiras.

Há muito não espera do mundo os louros da vitória
Estudar, trabalhar é sua história, e a tua maior glória
Hás de encontrar na paz do dever cumprido.

Quando a vivência teus cabelos prateando
E o teu sábio bisturi, num canto repousando

Uma vez que sua missão vai terminando
Espera do bom Deus  por tudo, a ti, seja piedoso.

SOIS VÓS INSTRUMENTO DA TUA OBRA.

.

The Qualities of a GOOD SURGEON


Following is a list of Dr. Ephraim McDowell’s personal qualities described as “C” words along with evidence corroborating each of the characteristics.


Courageous: When he agreed to attempt an operation that his teachers had stated was doomed to result in death, he, as well as his patient, showed great courage.

Compassionate:  He was concerned for his patient and responded to Mrs. Crawford’s pleas for help.

Communicative: He explained to his patient the details of her condition and her chances of survival so that she could make an informed choice.

Committed: He promised his patient that if she traveled to Danville, he would do the operation. He made a commitment to her care.

Confident: He assured the patient that he would do his best, and she expressed confidence in him by traveling 60 miles by horseback to his home.

Competent: Although lacking a formal medical degree, he had served an apprenticeship in medicine for 2 years in Staunton, Virginia, and he had spent 2 years in the study of medicine at the University of Edinburgh, an excellent medical school. In addition, he had taken private lessons from John Bell, one of the best surgeons in Europe. By 1809 he was an experienced surgeon.

Carefull: Despite the fact that 2 physicians had pronounced Mrs. Crawford as pregnant, he did a careful physical examination and diagnosed that she was not pregnant but had an ovarian tumor. He also carefully planned each operative procedure with a review of the pertinent anatomic details. As a devout Presbyterian, he wrote special prayers for especially difficult cases and performed many of these operations on Sundays.

Courteous: He was humble and courteous in his dealings with others. Even when he was publicly and privately criticized after the publication of his case reports, he did not react with vitriol. The qualities of character demonstrated by Dr. Ephraim McDowell 200 years ago are still essential for surgeons today.

%d blogueiros gostam disto: