Arquivos de Categoria: Cirurgia Geral

Surgical management of gastrointestinal bleeding

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Severe gastrointestinal bleeding has historically been a clinical problem primarily under the purview of the general surgeon. Diagnostic advances made as the result of newer technologies, such as fiberoptic and video endoscopy, selective visceral arteriography, and nuclear scintigraphy, have permitted more accurate and targeted operations. More importantly, they have led to safe, effective nonoperative therapeutic interventions that have obviated the need for surgery in many patients. Today, most gastrointestinal bleeding episodes are initially managed by endoscopic or angiographic control measures. Such interventions are often definitive in obtaining hemostasis. Even temporary cessation or attenuation of massive bleeding in an unstable patient permits a safer, more controlled operative procedure by allowing an adequate period of preoperative resuscitation. Despite the less frequent need for surgical intervention, traditional operative approaches, such as suture ligation, lesion or organ excision, vagotomy, portasystemic anastomosis, and devascularization procedures, continue to be life-saving in many instances. The proliferation of laparoscopic surgery has fostered the application of minimally invasive techniques to highly selected patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Intraoperative endoscopy has greatly facilitated the accuracy of laparoscopic surgery by endoscopic localization of bleeding lesions requiring excision. It is anticipated that the evolving technologies pertinent to the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal bleeding will continue to promote collaboration and cooperation between gastroenterologists, radiologists, and surgeons.

Surgical Management

The role of surgery in acute peptic ulcer bleeding has markedly changed over the past two decades. The widespread use of endoscopic treatment has reduced the number of patients requiring surgery. Therefore, the need for routine early surgical consultation in all patients presenting with acute UGIB is now obviated (Gralnek et al., 2008). Emergency surgery should not be delayed, even if the patient is in haemodynamic shock, as this may lead to mortality (Schoenberg, 2001). Failure to stop bleeding with endoscopic haemostasis and/or interventional radiology is the most important and definite indication. The surgical procedures under these circumstances should be limited to achieve haemostasis. The widespread use of PPIs obviated further surgical procedures to reduce acid secretion. Rebleeding tends to necessitate emergency surgery in approximately 60% of cases with an increase in morbidity and mortality (Schoenberg et al.; 2001). The reported mortality rates after emergency surgery range from 2 – 36%. Whether to consider endoscopic retreatment or surgery for bleeding after initial endoscopic control is controversial (Cheung et al., 2009). A second attempt at endoscopic haemostasis is often effective (Cheung et al., 2009), with fewer complications avoiding some surgery without increasing mortality (Lau et al., 1999). Therefore, most patients with evidence of rebleeding can be offered a second attempt at endoscopic haemostasis. This is often effective, may result in fewer complications than surgery, and is the current recommended management approach. Available data suggest that early elective surgery for selected high-risk patients with bleeding peptic ulcer might decrease the overall mortality rate. It is a reasonable approach in ulcers measuring ≥2 cm or patients with hypotension at rebleeding that independently predicts endoscopic retreatment failure (Lau et al., 1999). Early elective surgery in patients presenting with arterial bleeding or a visible vessel of ≥2 mm is superior to endoscopic retreatment and has a relatively low overall mortality rate of 5% (Imhof et al., 1998 & 2003). Additional indications for early elective surgery include age >65 years, previous admission for ulcer plication, blood transfusion of more than 6 units in the first 24 hours and rebleeding within 48 hours (Bender et al., 1994; Mueller et al., 1994). This approach is associated with a low 30–day mortality rate as low as 7%.

Pringle Maneuver

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After the first major hepatic resection, a left hepatic resection, carried out in 1888 by Carl Langenbuch, it took another 20 years before the first right hepatectomy was described by Walter Wendel in 1911. Three years before, in 1908, Hogarth Pringle provided the first description of a technique of  vascular control, the portal triad clamping, nowadays known as the Pringle maneuver. Liver surgery has progressed rapidly since then. Modern surgical concepts and techniques, together with advances in anesthesiological care, intensive care medicine, perioperative imaging, and interventional radiology, together with multimodal oncological concepts, have resulted in fundamental changes. Perioperative outcome has improved significantly, and even major hepatic resections can be performed with morbidity and mortality rates of less than 45% and 4% respectively in highvolume liver surgery centers. Many liver surgeries performed routinely in specialized centers today were considered to be high-risk or nonresectable by most surgeons less than 1–2 decades ago.Interestingly, operative blood loss remains the most important predictor of postoperative morbidity and mortality, and therefore vascular control remains one of the most important aspects in liver surgery.

“Bleeding control is achieved by vascular control and optimized and careful parenchymal transection during liver surgery, and these two concepts are cross-linked.”

First described by Pringle in 1908, it has proven effective in decreasing haemorrhage during the resection of the liver tissue. It is frequently used, and it consists in temporarily occluding the hepatic artery and the portal vein, thus limiting the flow of blood into the liver, although this also results in an increased venous pressure in the mesenteric territory. Hemodynamic repercussion during the PM is rare because it only diminishes the venous return in 15% of cases. The cardiovascular system slightly increases the systemic vascular resistance as a compensatory response, thereby limiting the drop in the arterial pressure. Through the administration of crystalloids, it is possible to maintain hemodynamic stability.

Resultado de imagem para Methods of vascular control in hepatic resections

In the 1990s, the PM was used continuously for 45 min and even up to an hour because the depth of the potential damage that could occur due to hepatic ischemia was not yet known. During the PM, the lack of oxygen affects all liver cells, especially Kupffer cells which represent the largest fixed macrophage mass. When these cells are deprived of oxygen, they are an endless source of production of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukins 1, 6, 8 and 10. IL 6 has been described as the cytokine that best correlates to postoperative complications. In order to mitigate the effects of continuous PM, intermittent clamping of the portal pedicle has been developed. This consists of occluding the pedicle for 15 min, removing the clamps for 5 min, and then starting the manoeuvre again. This intermittent passage of the hepatic tissue through ischemia and reperfusion shows the development of hepatic tolerance to the lack of oxygen with decreased cell damage. Greater ischemic tolerance to this intermittent manoeuvre increases the total time it can be used.

Hepatic Surgery: Portal Vein Embolization

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INTRODUCTION

Portal vein Embolizations (PVE) is commonly used in the patients requiring extensive liver resection but have insufficient Future Liver Remanescent (FLR) volume on preoperative testing. The procedure involves occluding portal venous flow to the side of the liver with the lesion thereby redirecting portal flow to the contralateral side, in an attempt to cause hypertrophy and increase the volume of the FLR prior to hepatectomy.

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PVE was first described by Kinoshita and later reported by Makuuchi as a technique to facilitate hepatic resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The technique is now widely used by surgeons all over the world to optimize FLR volume before major liver resections.

PHYSIOPATHOLOGY

PVE works because the extrahepatic factors that induce liver hypertrophy are carried primarily by the portal vein and not the hepatic artery. The increase in FLR size seen after PVE is due to both clonal expansion and cellular hypertrophy, and the extent of post-embolization liver growth is generally proportional to the degree of portal flow diversion. The mechanism of liver regeneration after PVE is a complex phenomenon and is not fully understood. Although the exact trigger of liver regeneration remains unknown, several studies have identified periportal inflammation in the embolized liver as an important predictor of liver regeneration.

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THECNICAL ASPECTS

PVE is technically feasible in 99% of the patients with low risk of complications. Studies have shown the FLR to increase by a median of 40–62% after a median of 34–37 days after PVE, and 72.2–80% of the patients are able to undergo resection as planned. It is generally indicated for patients being considered for right or extended right hepatectomy in the setting of a relatively small FLR. It is rarely required before extended left hepatectomy or left trisectionectomy, since the right posterior section (segments 6 and 7) comprises about 30% of total liver volume.

PVE is usually performed through percutaneous transhepatic access to the portal venous system, but there is considerable variability in technique between centers. The access route can be ipsilateral (portal access at the same side being resected) with retrograde embolization or contralateral (portal access through FLR) with antegrade embolization. The type of approach selected depends on a number of factors including operator preference, anatomic variability, type of resection planned, extent of embolization, and type of embolic agent used. Many authors prefer ipsilateral approach especially for right-sided tumors as this technique allows easy catheterization of segment 4 branches when they must be embolized and also minimizes the theoretic risk of injuring the FLR vasculature or bile ducts through a contralateral approach and potentially making a patient ineligible for surgery. 

However, majority of the studies on contralateral PVE show it to be a safe technique with low complication rate. Di Stefano et al. reported a large series of contralateral PVE in 188 patients and described 12 complications (6.4%) only 6 of which could be related to access route and none precluded liver resection. Site of portal vein access can also change depending on the choice of embolic material selected which can include glue, Gelfoam, n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBC), different types and sizes of beads, alcohol, and nitinol plus. All agents have similar efficacy and there are no official recommendations for a particular type of agent.

RESULTS

Proponents of PVE believe that there should be very little or no tumor progression during the 4–6 week wait period for regeneration after PVE. Rapid growth of the FLR can be expected within the first 3–4 weeks after PVE and can continue till 6–8 weeks. Results from multiple studies suggest that 8–30% hypertrophy over 2–6 weeks can be expected with slower rates in cirrhotic patients. Most studies comparing outcomes after major hepatectomy with and without preoperative PVE report superior outcomes with PVE. Farges et al. demonstrated significantly less risk of postoperative complications, duration of intensive care unit, and hospital stay in patients with cirrhosis who underwent right hepatectomy after PVE compared to those who did not have preoperative PVE. The authors also reported no benefit of PVE in patients with a normal liver and FLR >30%. Abulkhir et al. reported results from a meta-analysis of 1088 patients undergoing PVE and showed a markedly lower incidence of Post Hepatectomy Liver Failure (PHLF) and death compared to series reporting outcomes after major hepatectomy in patients who did not undergo PVE. All patients had FLR volume increase, and 85% went on to have liver resection after PVE with a PHLF incidence of 2.5% and a surgical mortality of 0.8%. Several studies looking at the effect of systemic neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the degree of hypertrophy after PVE show no significant impact on liver regeneration and growth.

VOLUMETRIC RESPONSE

The volumetric response to PVE is also a very important factor in understanding the regenerative capacity of a patient’s liver and when used together with FLR volume can help identify patients at risk of poor postsurgical outcome. Ribero et al. demonstrated that the risk of PHLF was significantly higher not only in patients with FLR 20% but also in patients with normal liver who demonstrated 5% of FLR hypertrophy after PVE. The authors concluded that the degree of hypertrophy >10% in patients with severe underlying liver disease and >5% in patients with normal liver predicts a low risk of PHLF and post-resection mortality. Many authors do not routinely offer resection to patients with borderline FLR who demonstrate 5% hypertrophy after PVE.

Predicting LIVER REMNANT Function


Careful analysis of outcome based on liver remnant volume stratified by underlying liver disease has led to recommendations regarding the safe limits of resection. The liver remnant to be left after resection is termed the future liver remnant (FLR). For patients with normal underlying liver, complications, extended hospital stay, admission to the intensive care unit, and hepatic insufficiency are rare when the standardized FLR is >20% of the TLV. For patients with tumor-related cholestasis or marked underlying liver disease, a 40% liver remnant is necessary to avoid cholestasis, fluid retention, and liver failure. Among patients who have been treated with preoperative systemic chemotherapy for more than 12 weeks, FLR >30% reduces the rate of postoperative liver insufficiency and subsequent mortality.

Future_Liver_Remnant_Ozimo_Gama

When the liver remnant is normal or has only mild disease, the volume of liver remnant can be measured directly and accurately with threedimensional computed tomography (CT) volumetry. However, inaccuracy may arise because the liver to be resected is often diseased, particularly in patients with cirrhosis or biliary obstruction. When multiple or large tumors occupy a large volume of the liver to be resected, subtracting tumor volumes from liver volume further decreases accuracy of CT volumetry. The calculated TLV, which has been derived from the association between body surface area (BSA) and liver size, provides a standard estimate of the TLV. The following formula is used:

TLV (cm3) = –794.41 + 1267.28 × BSA (square meters)

Thus, the standardized FLR (sFLR) volume calculation uses the measured FLR volume from CT volumetry as the numerator and the calculated TLV as the denominator: Standardized FLR (sFLR) = measured FLR volume/TLV Calculating the standardized TLV corrects the actual liver volume to the individual patient’s size and provides an individualized estimate of that patient’s postresection liver function. In the event of an inadequate FLR prior to major hepatectomy, preoperative liver preparation may include portal vein embolization (PVE). 

Classroom: Principles of Hepatic Surgery

Videos of Surgical Procedures

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This page provides links to prerecorded webcasts of surgical procedures. These are actual operations performed at medical centers in the Brazil. Please note that you cannot send in questions by email, though the webcast may say that you can, because you are not seeing these videos live. The videos open in a second window. If you have a pop-up blocker, you will need to disable it to view the programs.

Videos of Surgical Procedures

Strangulation in GROIN HERNIAS

Importance 

In both the UK and the USA the annual death rate due to inguinal and femoral hernia has decreased in the last two to three decades. In the UK, deaths for inguinal and femoral hernia declined from 22 to 55% respectively from 1975 to 1990. The annual deaths in the USA per 100,000 population for patients with hernia and intestinal obstruction decreased from 5.1 in 1968 to 3.0 in 1988. For inguinal hernia with obstruction, 88% of patients underwent surgery with a mortality rate of 0.05%. These figures could be interpreted as showing that elective groin hernia surgery has reduced overall mortality rates.

In support of this contention is the fact that strangulation rates are lower in the USA than in the UK, which could be a consequence of the three times higher rate of elective hernia surgery in the USA. Even so, the available statistics show that rates of elective hernia surgery in the USA per 100,000 population fell from 358 to 220 between 1975 and 1990, although this may be an artifact of the data collection systems rather than a real decline.

During the period 1991–1992, 210 deaths occurring following inguinal hernia repair and 120 deaths following femoral hernia repair were investigated by the UK National Confidential Enquiry Into Perioperative Deaths. This enquiry is concerned with the quality of delivery of surgery, anesthesia, and perioperative care. Expert advisers compare the records of patients who have died with index cases. In this group of 330 patients many were elderly (45 were aged 80–89 years) and significantly infirm unfit; 24 were ASA grade III and 21 ASA grade IV. Postoperative mortality was attributed to preexisting cardiorespiratory problems in the majority of cases. In a nationwide study in Denmark of 158 patients dying after acute groin hernia repair, Kjaergaard et al. also found that these patients were old (median age 83 years) and fragile (>80% with significant comorbidity), with frequent delay in diagnosis and subsequent treatment. Clearly this group of patients requires high-quality care by an experienced surgeon and anesthetist with skills equivalent to that of the ASA grade of the patient.

Postoperative care should necessarily take place in a high-dependency unit or intensive therapy unit; this may necessitate transfer of selected patients to appropriate hospitals and facilities. Sensible decisions must be made in consultation with relatives of extremely elderly, frail, or moribund patients to adopt a humane approach, which may rule out interventional surgery.

Forty percent of patients with femoral hernia are admitted as emergency cases with strangulation or incarceration, whereas only 3% of patients with direct inguinal hernias present with strangulation. This clearly has implications for the prioritization on waiting lists when these types of hernia present electively to outpatient clinics. A groin hernia is at its greatest risk of strangulation within 3 months of its onset. For inguinal hernia at 3 months after presentation, the cumulative probability of strangulation is 2.8%, rising to 4.5% after 2 years. For femoral hernia the risk is much higher, with a 22% probability of strangulation at 3 months after presentation rising to 45% at 21 months. Right-sided hernias strangulate more frequently than left-sided hernias; this is possibly related to mesenteric anatomy.

Evidence-Based Medicine 

In a randomized trial, evaluating an expectative approach to minimally symptomatic inguinal hernias, Fitzgibbons et al. in the group of patients randomized to watchful waiting found a risk of an acute hernia episode of 1.8 in 1,000 patient years. In another trial, O’Dwyer and colleagues, randomizing patients with painless inguinal hernias to observation or operation, found two acute episodes in 80 patients randomized to observation. In both studies, a large percentage of patients randomized to nonoperative care were eventually operated due to symptoms. Neuhauser, who studied a population in Columbia where elective herniorrhaphy was virtually unobtainable, found an annual rate of strangulation of 0.29% for inguinal hernias.

Management of Strangulation

Diagnosis is based on symptoms and signs supplemented by diagnostic imaging when indicated. Pain over the hernia site is invariable, and obstruction with strangulation of intestine will cause colicky abdominal pain, distension, vomiting, and constipation. Physical examination may reveal degrees of dehydration with or without CNS depression, especially in the elderly if uremia is present, together with abdominal signs of intestinal obstruction. Femoral hernias can be easily missed, especially in the obese female, and a thorough examination should be performed in order to make the correct diagnosis. Frequently, however, physical examination alone is insuf fi ciently accurate to con fi rm the presence of a strangulating femoral hernia vs. lymphadenopathy vs. a lymph node abscess. In these instances, one may elect to perform radiographic studies such as an ultrasound or a CT scan on an urgent or emergent basis.

The choice of incision will depend on the type hernia if the diagnosis is confi dent. When the diagnosis is in doubt, a half Pfannenstiel incision 2 cm above the pubic ramus, extending laterally, will give an adequate approach to all types of femoral or inguinal hernia. The fundus of the hernia sac can then be approached and exposed and an incision made to expose the contents of the sac. This will allow determination of the viability of its contents. Nonviability will necessitate conversion of the transverse incision into a laparotomy incision followed by release of the constricting hernia ring, reduction of the contents of the sac, resection, and reanastomosis. Precautions should be taken to avoid contamination of the general peritoneal cavity by gangrenous bowel or intestinal contents. In the majority of cases, once the constriction of the hernia ring has been released, circulation to the intestine is reestablished and viability returns. Intestine that is initially dusky, aperistaltic, or dull in hue may pink up with a short period of warming with damp packs once the constriction band is released. If viability is doubtful, resection should be performed. Resection rates are highest for femoral or recurrent inguinal hernias and lowest for inguinal hernias. Other organs, such as bladder or omentum, should be resected, as the need requires. After peritoneal lavage and formal closure of the laparotomy incision, specific repair of the groin hernia defect should be performed. In this situation prosthetic mesh should not be used in an operative fi eld that has been contaminated and in which there is a relatively high risk of wound infection. The hernia repair should follow the general principles for elective hernia repair. It should be kept in mind, that in this group of predominantly frail and elderly patients with a very high postoperative mortality risk, the primary objective of the operation is to stop the vicious cycle of strangulation, and only secondary to repair the hernia defect.

Key Point

The risk of an acute groin hernia episode is of particular relevance, when discussing indication for operation of painless or minimally symptomatic hernias. A sensible approach in groin hernias would be, in accordance with the guidelines from the European Hernia Society to advise a male patient, that the risk of an acute operation, with an easily reducible (“disappears when lying down”) inguinal hernia with little or no symptoms, is low and that the indication for operation in this instance is not absolute, but also inform, that usually the hernia after some time will cause symptoms, eventually leading to an operation. In contrast, female patients with a groin hernia, due to the high frequency of femoral hernias and a relatively high risk of acute hernia episodes, should usually be recommended an operation.

Minimally Invasive Approach to Choledocholithiasis

Introduction

The incidence of choledocholithiasis in patients undergoing cholecystectomy is estimated to be 10 %. The presence of common bile duct stones is associated with several known complications including cholangitis, gallstone pancreatitis, obstructive jaundice, and hepatic abscess. Making the diagnosis early and prompt management is crucial. Traditionally, when choledocholithiasis is identified with intraoperative cholangiography during the cholecystectomy, it has been managed surgically by open choledochotomy and place- ment of a T-tube. This open surgical approach has a morbidity rate of 10–15 %, mortality rate of <1 %, with a <6 % incidence of retained stones. Patients who fail endoscopic retrieval of CBD stones, as well as cases in which an endoscopic approach is not appropriate, should be explored surgically.

Clinical Manifestation

Acute obstruction of the bile duct by a stone causes a rapid distension of the biliary tree and activation of local pain fibers. Pain is the most common presenting symptom for choledocholithiasis and is localized to either the right upper quadrant or to the epigastrium. The obstruction will also cause bile stasis which is a risk factor for bacterial over- growth. The bacteria may originate from the duodenum or the stone itself. The combination of biliary obstruction and colo- nization of the biliary tree will lead to the development of fevers, the second most common presenting symptom of cho- ledocholithiasis. Biliary obstruction, if unrelieved, will lead to jaundice. When these three symptoms (pain, fever, and jaundice) are found simultaneously, it is known as Charcot’s triad. This triad suggests the diagnosis of acute ascending cholangitis, a potentially life-threatening condition. If not treated promptly, this can lead to hypotension and decreased metal status, both signs of severe sepsis. When combined with Charcot’s triad, this constellation of symptoms is commonly referred to as Reynolds pentad.

Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration

Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) allows for single stage treatment of gallstone disease, reducing overall hospital stay, improving safety and cost-effectiveness when compared to the two-stage approach of ERCP and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Bile duct clearance can be confirmed by direct visualization with a choledochoscope. But, before the advent of choledochoscope, bile duct clearance was uncertain, and blind instrumentation of the duct resulted in accentuated edema and inflammation. Due to advancement in instruments, optical magnification, and direct visualization, laparoscopic exploration of the CBD results in fewer traumas to the bile duct. This has led to an increasing tendency to close the duct primarily, reducing the need for placement of T-tubes. Still, laparoscopic bile duct exploration is being done in only a few centers. Apart from the need for special instruments, there is also a significant learning curve to acquire expertise to be able to perform a laparoscopic bile duct surgery.

Morbidity and mortality rates of laparoscopic exploration are comparable to ERCP (2–17 and 1–5 %), and there is no clear difference in primary success rates between the two approaches. However, the endoscopic approach may be preferable for elderly and frail patients, who are at higher risk with surgery. Patients older than 70–80 years of age have a 4–10 % mortality rate with open duct exploration. It may be as high as 20 % in elderly patients undergoing urgent procedures. In comparison, advanced age and comor- bidities do not have a significant impact on overall complication rates for ERCP. A success rate of over 90 % has been reported with laparoscopic CBD exploration. Availability of surgical expertise and appropriate equipment affect the success rate of laparoscopic exploration, as does the size, number of the CBD stones, as well as biliary anatomy. Over the years, laparoscopic exploration has become efficient, safe, and cost effective. Complications include CBD laceration, stricture formation, bile leak, abscess, pancreatitis, and retained stones.

In cases of failure of laparoscopic CBD exploration, a guidewire or stent can be passed through the cystic duct, common bile duct, and through the ampulla into the duodenum followed by cholecystectomy. This makes the identification and cannulation of the ampulla easier during the post- operative ERCP. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration is traditionally performed through a transcystic or transductal approach. The transcystic approach is appropriate under certain circumstances. These include a small stone (<10 mm) located in the CBD, presence of small common bile duct (<6 mm), or if there is poor access to the common duct. The transductal approach is preferable in cases of large stones, stones in proximal ducts (hepatic ducts), large occluding stones in a large duct, presence of multiple stones, or if the cystic duct is small (<4 mm) or tortuous. Contraindications for laparoscopic approach include lack of training, and severe inflammation in the porta hepatis making the exploration difficult and risky.

Key Points

With advancement in imaging technology, laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques, management of common bile duct stone has changed drasti- cally in recent years. This has made the treatment of this condition safe and more efficient. Many options are now available to manage this condition, and any particular modality for treatment should be chosen carefully based on the patient related factors, institutional protocol, available expertise, resources, and cost-effectiveness.

Classroom: M.I.A. of Choledocholithiasis

Management of Complicated Appendicitis: Open or Laparoscopic Surgery?

Patients with acute appendicitis can present at different stages of the disease process, ranging from mild mucosal inflammation to frank perforation with abscess formation. The reported overall incidence of acute appendicitis varies with age, gender, and geographical differences. Interestingly, while the incidence of non-perforated appendicitis in the United States decreased between 1970 and 2004, no significant decline in the rate of perforated appendicitis was observed despite the increasng use of computed tomography (CT) and fewer negative appendectomies.

Of 32,683 appendectomies sampled from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) hospitals between 2005 and 2008, 5,405 patients (16.5%) had a preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis with peritonitis/abscess.

The definition of complicated appendicitis varies slightly in the literature. Clinicopathological diagnoses (gangrenous, perforated, appendiceal abscess/phlegmon) of acute appendicitis are commonly used for its definition. Classically, patients at the extremes of age are more likely to present with complicated appendicitis. Similarly, pre-morbid conditions including diabetes and type of medical insurance are significantly associated with the risk of perforation.

The importance of early appendectomy has also been emphasized to prevent perforation of the appendix and the sub- sequent negative impact on patient outcomes. However, more recent meta-analysis data supports the safety of a relatively short (12–24 h) delay before appendectomy, which was not significantly associated with increased rate of complicated appendicitis. Teixeira et al. also showed that the time to appendectomy was not a significant risk factor for perforated appendicitis but did result in a significantly increased risk of surgical site infection.

The outcome of patients with complicated appendicitis is significantly worse than patients with uncomplicated appendicitis. A population-based study from Sweden showed that, in a risk-adjusted model, patients with perforated appendicitis were 2.34 times more likely to die after appendectomy than non- perforated appendicitis patients. Because of its higher mortality and morbidity in patients with complicated appendicitis, the management of complicated appendicitis has evolved significantly over the last few decades.

Open or Laparoscopic Surgery 

Since the first laparoscopic appendectomy was described by Semm in 1983, multiple studies have compared operative time, complication rates, length of hospital stay, hospital cost, and other outcomes between open and laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis. The most recent Cochrane review included 67 studies showing that laparoscopic appendectomy was associated with a lower incidence of wound infection, reduced postoperative pain, shorter postoperative length of hospital stay, and faster recovery to daily activity. In contrast, reduced risk of intra-abdominal abscesses and shorter operative time were found as the advantages of open appendectomy.

Due to increased surgeon experience in uncomplicated appendicitis, laparoscopic appendectomy is more frequently attempted even in complicated appendicitis cases as an alternative approach to open appendectomy. Although the general surgical steps for complicated appendicitis are similar to those for uncomplicated appendicitis, the laparoscopic procedure can be more technically demanding. Therefore, conversion from laparoscopic appendectomy to open appendectomy can be expected.

Despite these concerns, the laparoscopic approach in patients with com- plicated appendicitis has been proven to be safe and comparable to open appendectomy. Retrospective studies using a large database in the United States uniformly showed more favorable clinical outcomes (mortality, morbidity, length of hospital stay, readmission rate) and hospital costs in patients who underwent laparoscopic appendectomy when compared to open appendectomy. The real risk of developing an intra- abdominal abscess after laparoscopic appendectomy remains unclear. A meta-analysis by Markides et al. found no significant difference in the intra-abdominal abscess rate between laparoscopic and open appendectomy for complicated appendicitis, whereas Ingraham et al. showed a higher likelihood of developing an organ-space surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy.

Non Operative Management of SPLENIC TRAUMA

Resultado de imagem para splenic trauma

The spleen, an important component of the reticuloendothelial system in normal adults, is a highly vascular solid organ that arises as a mass of differentiated mesenchymal tissue during early embryonic development. The normal adult spleen weighs between 75 and 100 g and receives an average blood flow of 300 mL/min. It functions as the primary filter of the reticuloendothelial system by sequestering and removing antigens, bacteria, and senescent or damaged cellular elements from the circulation. In addition, the spleen has an important role in humoral immunity because it produces immunoglobulin M and opsonins for the complement activation system.

The increased availability of high-resolution CT scan and advances in arterial angiography and embolization techniques have contributed to the success of nonoperative management of splenic injuries.

The hemodynamically stable patient with blunt splenic trauma can be adequately managed with bed rest, serial abdominal exams, and hemoglobin and hematocrit monitoring. This approach, in combination with occasional angiography, especially for grade III and IV injuries, confers a splenic salvage rate of up to 95%.

In the setting of expectant management, indications for angiography have been delineated by several studies and include the following CT scan features: contrast extravasation, the presence of a pseudoaneurysm, significant hemoperitoneum, high-grade injury, and evidence of a vascular injury. The goal of angiography is to localize bleeding and embolize the source with coils or a gelatin foam product. Embolization can occur either at the main splenic artery just distal to the dorsal pancreatic portion of the vessel—known as proximal embolization—or selectively at the distal branch of the injured vessel. The goal behind the former technique is to decrease the perfusion pressure to the spleen to encourage hemostasis. The disadvantage to this technique is global splenic ischemia, and many have questioned the spleen’s immunocompetence following proximal embolization.

Malhotra et al. examined the effects of angioembolization on splenic function by examining serum levels of a particular T-cell line. T-cell proportions between patients who had undergone splenic embolization with asplenic patients and healthy controls were similar suggesting some degree of splenic immunocompetency was maintained. A Norwegian study comparing blood samples from patients who had undergone angioembolization with healthy controls demonstrated that the study samples had similar levels of pneumococcal immunoglobulins and no Howell-Jolly bodies, suggesting normal splenic function. Although these preliminary studies remain encouraging, there is no definitive evidence that splenic immunocompetency is fully maintained following angio-embolization.

There is no question that advancements in interventional techniques have contributed to the successful nonoperative management of splenic injuries. This has certainly changed the strategy, but it has not completely replaced operative intervention. The challenge now remains predicting those patients who will ultimately require splenectomy.

Many groups have studied potential predictors of nonoperative failure. Earlier studies found that a higher injury grade, increased transfusion requirement, and hypotension on initial presentation consistently predicted failure of nonoperative management. More recent literature reflects the use of advanced imaging techniques for predicting which patients will ultimately require splenectomy. Haan looked at the overall outcomes of patients admitted with blunt splenic trauma and reported several radiographic findings that were prevalent among patients requiring splenectomy after angioembolization:

  1. contrast extravasation,
  2. pseudoaneurysm,
  3. significant hemoperitoneum,
  4. and arteriovenous fistula.

Among these characteristics, an arteriovenous fistula had the highest rate of nonoperative failure at 40%. Nonradiographic features associated with significant risk of nonoperative failure include age greater than 40, injury severity score of 25 or greater, or presence of large-volume hemoperitoneum.

Aside from radiographic findings, some groups have also examined the mechanism of injury and its association with nonoperative failure. Plurad et al. conducted a retrospective review over a 15-year period and found that patients who were victims of blunt assault were more likely to fail nonoperative management: 36% of these patients required splenectomy versus 11.5% of patients from all other mechanisms combined. These findings suggest that regardless of overall injury severity, individuals who sustain a direct transfer of injury to the left torso are more likely to require splenectomy.

Currently, the accepted standard of care for most splenic trauma is expectant management with close observation. Operative intervention is reserved for the hemodynamically labile patient who shows signs of active hemorrhage and who does not respond appropriately to fluid resuscitation. Although these clinical scenarios seem straightforward, it is often the condition of the patient who falls in between the two ends of the spectrum that can be the most challenging to manage. In the setting of advanced imaging techniques and interventional radiology, the trauma surgeon has more diagnostic information and more treatment options for the patient with splenic trauma.

Perioperative Medicine

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Surgery and anesthesia profoundly alter the normal physiologic and metabolic states. Estimating the patient’s ability to respond to these stresses in the postoperative period is the task of the preoperative evaluation. Perioperative complications are often the result of failure, in the preoperative period, to identify underlying medical conditions, maximize the patient’s preoperative health, or accurately assess perioperative risk. Sophisticated laboratory studies and specialized testing are no substitute for a thoughtful and careful history and physical examination. Sophisticated technology has merit primarily in confirming clinical suspicion.

Classroom: Perioperative Medicine

How to Choose a Mesh in Hernia Repair

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Since the introduction of polypropylene (PP) mesh for hernia repair, surgeons continue to discuss the use of mesh in a variety of settings for one of the most common operations performed by general surgeons—hernia repair. This discussion has involved raw materials, cost, and outcomes and for many years referred to only a few products, as manufacturing was limited. Nowadays, with multiple permanent, absorbable, biologic, and hybrid products on the market, the choice of mesh for a hernia repair can be daunting. Increasing clinical complexity further emphasizes the need for individualizing care, but more frequently, hospital supply chain personnel institute product procurement procedures for cost control, limiting mesh choice for surgeons. This can force surgeons into a “one-size-fits-all” practice regarding mesh choice, which may not be ideal for some patients. Conversely, current literature lacks definitive evidence supporting the use of one mesh over another, a fact that has not escaped the radar screen of the hospital supply chain and mesh industry, both of which attempt to limit vendor and mesh choice for financial gain. It is unlikely that this type of “proof” will ever come to fruition. This leaves us with choosing a mesh based on an algorithm that is centered on the patient and the patient’s unique clinical scenario.

Article: Mesh in Hernia Repair

7 MOST QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SURGEON PROFESSION

Reassuring Worried MotherWhat is a Surgical Profession?

The professions are the means by which the complex services needed by society are organized. A profession has been defined by the American College of Surgeons as: an occupation whose core element is work that is based upon the mastery of a complex body of knowledge and skills. It is a vocation in which knowledge of some department of science or learning, or the practice of an art founded upon it, is used in the service of others. Its members are governed by codes of ethics and profess a commitment to competence, integrity and morality, altruism and to the promotion of the public good within their domain. These commitments form the basis of a social contract between a profession and society, which, in turn, grants the profession a monopoly over the use of its knowledge base, the right to considerable autonomy in practice and the privilege of self-regulation. Professions and their members are accountable to those served and to society.

1. What are the core elements of a profession? All professions are characterized by four core elements: (1) a monopoly over the use of specialized knowledge; (2) in return for that monopoly that we enjoy, relative autonomy in practice and the responsibility of self-regulation; (3) altruistic service to individuals and society; and (4) responsibility for maintaining and expanding professional knowledge and skills.

3.What is professionalism? Professionalism describes the cognitive, moral, and collegial attributes of a professional. Ultimately, it is all the reasons that your mother is proud to say that you are a doctor and a surgeon.

4. Why do physicians need a code of professional conduct? Trust is integral to the practice of surgery. The Code of Professional Conduct clarifies the relationship between the surgical profession and the society it serves. This is often referred to as a social contract. For patients the code of professional conduct crystallizes the commitment of the surgical community toward individual patients and their communities. Trust is built brick by brick.

5. What is the Code of Professional Conduct ? The Code of Professional Conduct takes the general principles of professionalism and applies them to surgical practice. The code is the foundation on which we earn our professional privileges and the trust of patients and the public. It is our job description. During the continuum of the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care surgeons have the responsibility to:

5.1 Serve as effective advocates for our patients’ needs.

5.2 Disclose therapeutic options including their risks and benefits.

5.3 Disclose and resolve any conflict of interest that might influence the decisions of care.

5.4 Be sensitive and respectful of patients, understanding their vulnerability during the perioperative period.

5.5 Fully disclose adverse events and medical errors.

5.6 Acknowledge patients’ psychological, social, cultural and spiritual needs.

5.7 Encompass within our surgical care the special needs of terminally ill patients.

5.8 Acknowledge and support the needs of patients’ families and

5.9 Respect the knowledge, dignity, and perspective of other healthcare professionals.

6. Why do surgeons need their own code of professionalism? A surgical procedure is an extreme experience. We impact our patients physiologically, psychologically, and socially. When patients submit themselves to a surgical experience, they must trust that the surgeon will put their welfare above all other considerations. The written code helps to reinforce these values.

7. What are the fundamental principles of the Code of Professional Conduct and the codes of other professional societies?

7.1 The primacy of patient welfare.

This means that the patient’s interests always come first. Altruism is central to this concept, and it is the surgeon’s altruism that fosters trust in the physician-patient relationship. 

7.2 Patient autonomy.

Patients must understand and make their own informed decisions about their treatment. This is tricky. As physicians we must be honest with our patients so that they make educated decisions. At the same time, we must make sure that their decisions are consistent with ethical practices and do not lead to demands for inappropriate care. 

7.3 Social justice.

As physicians we must advocate for our individual patients while at the same time promoting the health of the healthcare system as a whole. We must balance our patient’s needs (autonomy) and not misdirect scarce resources that benefit society (social justice).

Cuidados Gerais com a FERIDA PÓS-OPERATÓRIA

A avaliação e os cuidados de feridas pós-operatórias deve ser do domínio de todos os profissionais que atuam na clínica cirúrgica. O conhecimento a cerca dos processos relacionados a cicatrização tecidual é importante tanto nos cuidados como na prevenção de complicações, tais como: infecções e deiscência. Como tal, todos os profissionais médicos, sendo eles cirurgiões ou de outras especialidades, que participam do manejo clínico dos pacientes no período perioperatório devem apreciar a fisiologia da cicatrização de feridas e os princípios de tratamento de feridas pós-operatório. O objetivo deste artigo é atualizar os profissionais médicos de outras especialidades sobre os aspectos importantes do tratamento de feridas pós-operatório através de uma revisão da fisiologia da cicatrização de feridas, os métodos de limpeza e curativo, bem como um guia sobre complicações de feridas pós-operatórias mais prevalentes e como devem ser manejados nesta situação.

MANEJO CLÍNICO DA FERIDA OPERATÓRIA

Causas de conversão da VIDEOCOLECISTECTOMIA

OZIMO_GAMA_CIRURGIÃO_DIGESTIVOEstima-se que atualmente 90% das colecistectomias sejam realizadas pela técnica laparoscópica, percentual este atingido nos Estados Unidos da América no ano de 1992. Os motivos para tal preferência na escolha da técnica cirúrgica aplicada são claros: menor dor no pós-operatório, recuperação pós-cirúrgica mais rápida, menor número de dias de trabalho perdidos e menor tempo de permanência hospitalar. A colecistectomia laparoscópica foi claramente estabelecida como padrão-ouro para o tratamento cirúrgico da litíase biliar, no entanto 2 a 15% das colecistectomias vídeolaparoscópicas necessitam de conversão para cirurgia convencional, sendo as razões mais comuns a inabilidade para se identificar corretamente a anatomia, suspeita de lesão da árvore biliar e sangramento. A identificação dos fatores associados a um maior índice de conversão possibilita à equipe cirúrgica estimar o grau de dificuldade do procedimento, preparando melhor o paciente para o risco de conversão e permitindo a participação de um cirurgião mais experiente num procedimento de maior risco.

Relacionados ao Paciente: 1. Obesidade (IMC > 35), 2. Sexo Masculino, 3. Idade > 65 anos, 4. Diabetes Mellitus e 5. ASA > 2.

Relacionadas a Doença: 1. Colecistite Aguda, 2. Líquido Pericolecístico, 3. Pós – CPRE, 4. Síndrome de Mirizzi e 5. Edema da parede da vesícula > 5 mm.

Relacionadas a Cirurgia: 1. Hemorragia, 2. Aderências firmes, 3. Anatomia obscura, 4. Fístulas internas e 5. Cirurgia abdominal prévia.

POSTGASTRECTOMY SYNDROMES

GASTRECTOMY_OZIMOGAMA

The first postgastrectomy syndrome was noted not long after the first gastrectomy was performed: Billroth reported a case of epigastric pain associated with bilious vomiting as a sequel of gastric surgery in 1885. Several classic treatises exist on the subject; we cannot improve on them and merely provide a few references for the interested reader.

However, the indications for gastric resection have changed dramatically over the past 4 decades, and the overall incidence of gastric resection has decreased. The most marked reduction in the frequency of gastric resection has occurred among patients with peptic ulcer disease. For example, in Olmstead County, Minnesota, the incidence of elective operations on previously unoperated patients declined 8-fold during the 30-year study period between 1956 and 1985 and undoubtedly has declined even further since.

One population-based study concluded that elective surgery for ulcer disease had “virtually disappeared by 1992–1996.” Whereas emergency operations for bleeding and perforation are still encountered, acid-reducing procedures are being performed less frequently in these situations in favor of a damage control approach. Even for gastric cancer, resection rates decreased approximately 20% from 1988 to 2000 in the United States.

An estimated 21,000 new cases of stomach cancer occurred in the United States in 2010, so that the number of cases of gastric resection for cancer is probably less than 15,000 per year in the United States. The virtual disappearance of elective surgery for peptic ulcer has also changed the demographic profile of the postgastrectomy patient: patients who have gastric cancer tend to be older and there is only a slight male preponderance.

These significant changes in the gastric surgery population make it worthwhile to revisit postgastrectomy syndromes. The frequency with which postgastrectomy symptoms/syndromes are found can depend on how hard they are looked for. Loffeld, in a survey of 124 postgastrectomy patients, most of whom had undergone surgery more than 15 years earlier, found that 75% suffered from upper abdominal symptoms, and 1 or more symptoms that indicate dumping were found in 70% of patients who had undergone Billroth-II (B-II) reconstruction.

However, the lack of age-matched and sex-matched controls in this study may have overstated the frequency of symptoms caused by the surgical procedure. Mine and colleagues conducted a large survey of 1153 patients after gastrectomy for cancer and found that 67% reported early dumping and 38% late dumping. By contrast, Pedrazzani and colleagues surveyed 195 patients who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and B-II reconstruction for gastric adenocarcinoma for up to 5 years postoperatively, and concluded that “the incidence of late complications was low and the majority of them recovered within one year after surgery.”

This article focuses on the small proportion of patients with severe, debilitating symptoms; these symptoms can challenge the acumen of the surgeon who is providing the patient’s long-term follow-up and care.

POSTGASTRECTOMY_SYNDROMES_REVIEW_ARTICLE

Abdominal Hernia Surgical EMERGENCIES

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A hernia is a weakness or disruption of the fibromuscular tissues through which an internal organ (or part of the organ) protrudes or slides through. Collectively, inguinal and femoral hernias are often lumped together into groin hernias. Surgery remains the only effective treatment, but the optimal timing and method of repair remain controversial. Although strangulation rates of 3% at 3 months have been reported by some investigators, the largest prospective randomized trial of (watchful waiting) men with minimally symptomatic inguinal hernias showed that watchful waiting is safe. Frequency of strangulation was only 2.4% in patients followed up for as long as 11.5 years. Long-term follow-up shows that more than two-thirds of men using a strategy of watchful waiting cross over to surgical repair, with pain being the most common reasons. This risk of crossover is higher in patients older than 65 years. Once an inguinal hernia becomes symptomatic, surgical repair is clearly indicated. Femoral hernias are more likely to present with strangulation and require emergency surgery and are thus repaired even when asymptomatic. Because this article focuses on incarcerated hernias, nonoperative options are not discussed.

ABDOMINAL HERNIA EMERGENCIES_REVIEW ARTICLE

PRINCIPLES OF OSTOMY MANAGEMENT

The creation of a stoma is a technical exercise. Like most undertakings, if done correctly, the stoma will usually function well with minimal complications for the remainder of the ostomate’s life. Conversely, if created poorly, stoma complications are common and can lead to years of misery. Intestinal stomas are in fact enterocutaneous anastomoses and all the principles that apply to creation of any anastomosis (i.e., using healthy intestine, avoiding ischemia and undue tension) are important in stoma creation.

PRINCIPLES OF OSTOMY MANAGEMENT

PREVENTION COMPLICATIONS OF COLON SURGERY

COMPLICATIONS OF COLON SURGERY_REVIEW ARTICLE


Imagem relacionada


Colon surgery represents a high number of patients treated at a department of gastrointestinal surgery and is not limited to colon cancer. It includes other non-neoplastic pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease, diverticular disease or colonic volvulus. As with any major procedure, colon surgery patients may present serious or even fatal complications. The incidence of postoperative complications from colon surgery has been estimated at between 10% and 30% according to selected series. Preventive measures against surgical complications include selection of an appropriate procedure for the patient as well as good preoperative care, appropriate surgical technique and good postoperative management. When diagnosis has been established, risks for patient should be assessed according to patient’s health conditions and type of surgery accomplished. When the patient meets the surgical requirements, an appropriate course of preoperative care should be carried out including colon wash  antibiotics and antithrombotic prophylaxis. Postoperative period will be equivalent to any major abdominal surgery. Typically, it was considered appropriate to wait a few days before initiating feeding in order to protect anastomosis; however, some authors agree that an early oral diet hours after intervention is not associated with a higher risk of anastomotic dehiscence and other complications.


Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery


With the introduction of laparoscopic colectomy nearly 20 years ago, a relatively slow adoption of laparoscopic colorectal surgery into surgical practice has taken place. It is estimated that 10% to 25% of all colorectal resections are performed utilizing laparoscopy. The persistent steep learning curve, the lack of high-volume colorectal surgery by general surgeons (who perform the bulk of colonic resection in the United States), and the modest advantages reported are but a few of the reasons that the percentage of laparoscopic colorectal procedures has not dramatically risen. With the publication of several large, prospective randomized trials for colon cancer, along with the interest in single-port surgery and natural orifice surgery, there appears to be a renewed interest in minimally invasive procedures for the colon and rectum. This chapter will provide an overview of these issues and offer a current assessment of the common diseases to which minimally invasive techniques have been applied.

Learning Curve

Numerous previous studies have evaluated the learning curve involved in laparoscopic colectomy. It is estimated by conventional laparoscopic techniques that the learning curve for laparoscopic colectomy is at least 20 cases but more likely 50 cases. The need to work in multiple quadrants of the abdomen, the need for a skilled laparoscopic assistant, and the lack of yearly volume has kept the learning curve relatively steep. The surgeon may also need to work in reverse angles to the camera. All of these combined add to the complexity of the procedure and result in the need to perform a number of cases before the surgeon and surgical team become proficient. More recent publications have suggested the learning curve is more than 20 cases. In a prospective randomized study of colorectal cancer in the United Kingdom, the CLASICC trial, surgeons had to perform at least 20 laparoscopic resections before they were allowed to enter the study. The study began in July 1996 and was completed in July 2002. Despite the surgeons’ prior experience, the rate of conversion dropped from 38% to 16% over the course of the study, suggesting that a minimum of 20 cases may not be enough to overcome the learning curve. In the COLOR trial from Europe, another prospective randomized study for colon cancer that required a prerequisite experience in laparoscopic colon resection before surgeons could enter patients in the study, surgeon and hospital volume were directly related to a number of operative and postoperative outcomes. The median operative time for high-volume hospitals (>10 cases/year) was 188 minutes, compared to 241 minutes for low-volume hospitals (<5 cases/year); likewise, conversion rates were 9% versus 24% for the two groups. High-volume groups also had more lymph nodes in the resected specimens, fewer complications, and shortened hospital stays. These two relatively recent multicenter studies suggest that the learning curve is clearly greater than 20 cases and that surgeons need to perform a minimum yearly number of procedures to maintain their skills.

Outcomes

There may not be another area in recent surgical history that has been more heavily scrutinized than laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The plethora of accumulated data allows a careful assessment of all outcome measures for nearly every colorectal disease and procedure. In comparison to conventional colorectal surgery, the benefits of laparoscopy for colorectal procedures compared to open techniques include a reduction in postoperative ileus, postoperative pain, and a concomitant reduction in the need for analgesics; an earlier tolerance of diet; a shortened hospital stay; a quicker resumption of normal activities; improved cosmesis; and possibly preservation of immune function. This is offset by a prolongation in operative time, the cost of laparoscopic equipment, and the learning curve for these technically challenging procedures. When reporting the outcomes of laparoscopic colectomy, a natural selection bias applies when comparing conventional and laparoscopic cases. The most complex cases are generally not suitable for a laparoscopic approach and therefore are performed via an open approach. Also, in many series the results of the successfully completed laparoscopic cases are compared to conventional cases, and the cases converted from a laparoscopic to a conventional procedure may be analyzed separately. Few studies, with the exception of the larger prospective randomized studies, leave the converted cases in the laparoscopic group as part of the “intention to treat” laparoscopic group. This clearly introduces selection bias.

Although the results of prospective randomized trials are available for almost every disease process requiring colorectal resection, the majority of studies of laparoscopic colectomy are retrospective case-control series or noncomparative reports. The conclusions regarding patient outcomes must therefore come from the repetitiveness of the results rather than the superiority of the study design. For any one study, the evidence may be weak; but collectively, because of the reproducibility of results by a large number of institutions, even with different operative techniques and postoperative management parameters, the preponderance of evidence favors a minimally invasive approach with respect to postoperative outcomes.

 Operative Time

Nearly all the comparative studies provide information regarding operative times. The definition of the operative time may vary with each series, and there may be different groups of surgeons performing the laparoscopic and conventional procedures. With the exception of a few reports, nearly all studies demonstrated a prolonged operative time associated with laparoscopic procedures. In prospective randomized trials, the procedure was roughly 40 to 60 minutes longer in the laparoscopic groups. As the surgeon and team gain experience with laparoscopic colectomy, the operating times do reliably fall, but rarely do they return to the comparable time for a conventional approach.

 Return of Bowel Activity and Resumption of Diet

Reduction in postoperative ileus is one of the proposed major advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Nearly all of the retrospective and prospective studies comparing open and laparoscopic colectomy have shown a statistically significant reduction in the time to passage of flatus and stool. Most series demonstrate a 1- to 2-day advantage for the laparoscopic group. Whether the reduction of ileus relates to less bowel manipulation or less intestinal exposure to air during minimally invasive surgery remains unknown. With the reduction in postoperative ileus, the tolerance by the patient of both liquids and solid foods is quicker following laparoscopic resection. The time to resumption of diet varies from 2 days to 7 days, but in the majority of comparative studies, this is still 1 to 2 days sooner than in patients undergoing conventional surgery. Again, the physician and patient were not blinded in nearly all studies, which may have altered patient expectations. However, the overwhelming reproducible data reported in both retrospective and prospective studies of laparoscopic procedures does likely favor a reduction of postoperative ileus and tolerance of liquid and solid diets.

 Postoperative Pain

To measure postoperative pain, a variety of assessments have been performed to demonstrate a significant reduction in pain following minimally invasive surgery; some studies utilize an analog pain scale, and others measure narcotic requirements. Physician bias and psychologic conditioning of patients may interfere with the evaluation of postoperative pain. There are also cultural variations in the response to pain. Three of the early prospective randomized trials have evaluated pain postoperatively, and all three have found a reduction in narcotic requirements in patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy. In the COST study, the need both for intravenous and oral analgesics was less in patients undergoing successfully completed laparoscopic resections. Numerous other nonrandomized studies have shown a reduction in postoperative pain and narcotic usage.

 Length of Stay

The quicker resolution of ileus, earlier resumption of diet, and reduced postoperative pain has resulted in a shortened length of stay for patients after laparoscopic resection when compared to traditional procedures. Recovery after conventional surgery has also been shortened, but in the absence of minimally invasive techniques, it would seem unlikely that the length of stay could be further reduced. In nearly all comparative studies, the length of hospitalization was 1 to 6 days less for the laparoscopic group. Although psychological conditioning of the patient cannot be helped and likely has a desirable effect, the benefits of minimally invasive procedures on the overall length of stay cannot be discounted. The benefit, however, is more likely a 1 to 2 day advantage only. The more recent introduction of clinical pathways, both in conventional and laparoscopic surgery, has also narrowed the gap but appears to be more reliable in patients undergoing a minimally invasive approach.

 Hospital Costs

One of the disadvantages of laparoscopy is the higher cost related to longer operative times and increased expenditures in disposable equipment. Whether the total cost of the hospitalization (operative and hospital costs) is higher following laparoscopic colectomy is debatable. A case-control study from the Mayo Clinic looked at total costs following laparoscopic and open ileocolic resection for Crohn’s disease (CD). In this study, 66 patients underwent laparoscopic or conventional ileocolic resection and were well matched. Patients in the laparoscopic group had less postoperative pain, tolerated a regular diet 1 to 2 days sooner, and had a shorter length of stay (4 vs. 7 days). In the cost analysis, despite higher operative costs, the overall mean cost was $3273 less in the laparoscopic group. The procedures were performed by different groups of surgeons at the institution, and although the surgeons may have introduced biases, this study was undertaken during the current era of cost containment, in which all physicians are encouraged to reduce hospital stays. The results are similar for elective sigmoid diverticular resection with a mean cost savings of $700 to $800. Clearly, if operative times and equipment expenditure are minimized, the overall cost of a laparoscopic resection should not exceed a conventional approach.

Retromuscular Prefascial Mesh Hernia Repair (Jean RIVES – René STOPPA)

Rives-Stoppa

An incisional hernia is usually defined as a chronic postoperative defect of the abdominal wall through which intra-abdominal viscera protrude. Progress in surgical techniques, even with laparoscopic surgery, has not led to the elimination of incisional hernias. On the contrary, the incidence of this complication seems to be increasing as more major and lengthy operations are being performed, especially in elderly patients with concomitant organic disease. The incidence of this condition has been reported to be as high as 11% of all laparotomies. Surgical repair is difficult in the patient with a large abdominal wall defect, especially if the herniated viscera has “lost its right of domain” in the abdominal cavity. It must be remembered that surgical repair of an incisional hernia is not the same thing as closure of a laparotomy. Weakening of the abdominal wall and the consequences of decreased abdominal pressure on diaphragmatic mobility and respiratory function must also be considered. Placement of a prosthetic mesh is essential because without mesh, the recurrence rate is prohibitive, varying from 30% to 60%.  The  which is the subject of this article, was popularized by Jean Rives and has been used in our department since 1966.


RIVES_STOPPA_HERNIA_REPAIR

TRATAMENTO DA TROMBOSE HEMORROIDÁRIA

Trombose Hemorroidaria


INTRODUÇÃO

A doença hemorroidária é uma afecção bastante comum, contudo sua prevalência é subestimada devido a vários fatores, sendo os principais: variabilidade dos sintomas clínicos, grande número de pacientes  assintomáticos e vergonha por parte do paciente na informação ao seu médico assistente. A taxa de prevalência varia de 5% até 15% na população geral. Ocorre mais usualmente na raça branca, no sexo masculino, após a 3a década de vida e em pessoas com melhor condição econômica.

FISIOPATOLOGIA

A trombose hemorroidária é uma complicação aguda que ocorre tanto nas hemorróidas externas como internas, caracterizada pela presença de isquemia  e  trombo nos coxins vasculares submucosos do canal anal.

As hemorróidas ocorrem como resultado da degeneração dos tecidos de sustentação e suporte dos coxins vasculares anais (arteríolas, vênulas, comunicações arterio-venosas, músculo e tecido conjuntivo . As hemorróidas internas, externas e mistas são diferenciadas por sua origem anatômica no canal anal.

As hemorróidas internas originam-se acima da linha pectínea (endoderme), são recobertas pela mucosa anal (epitélio) e não tem inervação sensorial. As hemorróidas externas originam-se abaixo da linha pectínea (ectoderme), são recobertas por epitélio estratificado e inervadas pelo ramo retal inferior.

Quando ocorre a trombose nesses plexos submucosos, há uma reação inflamatória aguda, com eritema, calor e tumor local, que é responsável pelos sintomas apresentados pelos doentes.

Alguns pacientes apresentam volumosa estase sangüínea nos plexos hemorroidários, externos e internos, que pode evoluir para um processo inflamatório endoflebítico. Quando a área atingida é extensa, também é chamada de pseudo-estrangulamento hemorroidário. Associa-se freqüentemente a intenso edema e, sem tratamento, pode evoluir para ulceração e necrose da área afetada. Seu aparecimento é abrupto. A dor é muito intensa, contínua e tipo latejante. Há secreção e sangramento perianal, com características arteriais. Pode haver dificuldade evacuatória e retenção urinária. Diferentemente do hematoma perianal, raramente se evidenciam nódulos azulados, mas sim, intenso edema local. O diagnóstico da trombose hemorroidária é simples e fácil. Pela inspeção do ânus observa-se a presença de processo inflamatório agudo nos plexos hemorroidários, caracterizado por intenso edema, necrose e/ou ulceração. Eventualmente, o comprometimento plexular pode atingir e/ou ultrapassar a linha pectínea.

VEJA AQUI ONDE FAZER UMA AVALIAÇÃO ESPECIALIZADA E RECEBER UMA SEGUNDA OPINIÃO

FATORES DE RISCO

Os principais fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento da doença hemorroidária complicada são:

Dieta Industrializada

Hereditariedade

Constipação intestinal

Obesidade

Gravidez / Pós-parto imediato

Trauma local (Fezes Ressecadas)

QUADRO CLÍNICO

Os sintomas mais freqüentes são: dor anal aguda (proctalgia aguda) e constante, tumor anal com ou sem prolapso mucoso, e ás vezes sangramento (hematoquezia) na roupa íntima ou no papel higiênico. A dor tem maior intensidade nas primeiras 72 horas podendo regredir após esse período, assim que o trombo organizar-se, ocorrendo a involução espontânea em 7 a 10 dias. Muitas vezes a dor não é proporcional ao volume da trombose hemorroidária.

Deve-se pesquisar o hábito dietético e intestinal, a presença ou não de discrasias sangüíneas, doenças inflamatórias intestinais, hipertensão portal, doenças imunossupressoras (uso de AIHs – Predisona), anorexia, perda de peso e dor abdominal associada. Além do exame físico completo, é obrigatória a inspecção e palpação da região anal em posição de Sims (decúbito lateral esquerdo) ou genu-peitoral. Usualmente visibilizamos tumor anal doloroso e endurecido, de cor violácea ou avermelhada com sangramento (trombose ulcerada) ou não (trombose íntegra). Quando existem outros mamilos hemorroidários trombosados ou prolabados, caracteriza-se a trombose hemorroidária extensa.

VEJA AQUI ONDE FAZER UMA AVALIAÇÃO ESPECIALIZADA E RECEBER UMA SEGUNDA OPINIÃO

TRATAMENTO

O tratamento deve ser discutido com o pacientes e seus responsáveis visando o esclarecimento da conduta proposta. Ele poderá ser clínico ou operatório dependendo de vários fatores associados ao paciente (co-morbidades), momento do diagnóstico (mais de 72 horas) e finalmente ao estágio da doença hemorroidária.

5.1 Tratamento Clínico – Associa-se o uso de analgésicos por via oral a cada 4 a 6 horas, pomada heparinóide aplicada (Hirudóide R) sobre a tumoração local a cada 6 horas, medicamentos mucilaginosos como o Metamucil R ou Plantaben R, se houver obstipação intestinal e banhos de assento com água morna. Evitar, se possível, anti-inflamatórios por via oral ou injetável.

Quando o intenso edema e a necrose provocados pela trombose hemorroidária é irredutível a qualquer manobra para reduzi-la, mesmo sob analgesia, pode agravar o processo tromboflebítico. Seu tratamento, nestes casos, é preferencialmente cirúrgico, em caráter de urgência, desde que as condições clínicas do enfermo permitam a operação. A técnica a ser empregada, deverá ser aquela na qual o cirurgião tenha maior experiência. A hemorroidectomia, nesta fase aguda, tem apresentado resultados bons, desde que respeitadas as bases técnicas da cirurgia anorretal. Ela é segura e efetiva, ocasionando raras complicações pós-operatórias quando comparada à cirurgia eletiva. As vantagens deste procedimento na urgência são: alívio imediato dos sintomas, cura dos mamilos hemorroidários, diminuição do tempo de recuperação e menor período de inatividade do paciente.

5.2 Tratamento Operatório – A indicação operatória criteriosa, a anestesia apropriada, a técnica utilizada e os cuidados pós-operatórios adequados, são comemorativos importantes no sucesso do tratamento. Para as tromboses hemorroidárias localizadas preferimos a hemorroidectomia à Milligan-Morgan (técnica aberta) ou Ferguson (técnica fechada) com anestesia local com ou sem sedação endo-venosa; ou a trombectomia, que é a retirada do trombo somente, com anestesia local, em caráter ambulatorial. Para as tromboses hemorroidárias grandes e/ou extensas, preferimos a hemorroidectomia à Milligan-Morgan com anestesia raque e internação por 24 horas .

HEMORROIDECTOMY

Pós-Operatório Imediato – Utilizamos dieta com fibras e analgésicos usuais por via endo-venosa e/ou opiáceos, no caso de dor intensa.  As complicações pós-operatórias, mais importantes, são:

– Dor: Esta diretamente relacionada à técnica empregada e aos cuidados intra e pós-operatórios. Hemostasia adequada, fios de sutura finos, preservação das fibras musculares e mínimo trauma local são fundamentais para minimizá-la.

– Sangramento: A ligadura adequada dos pedículos vasculares e hemostasia rigorosa durante a hemorroidectomia são muito importantes na sua prevenção. O sangramento tardio é raro e, em geral, ocorre entre sete a dez dias após o procedimento, cessando, em sua maioria, espontaneamente.

– Fecaloma: O receio de que a evacuação pós-operatória possa desencadear ou agravar a dor da hemorroidectomia poderá fazer que alguns pacientes inibam a defecação podendo ocasionar a impactação fecal no reto com a formação de fecalomas. São tratados com enemas evacuatórios.

– Retenção urinária: Sua etiologia é controversa, porém o bloqueio anestésico e a pressão e distensão intra-retais são fatores desencadeantes importantes.

– Fissura anal: Está relacionada à má cicatrização da ferida operatória da hemorroidectomia, ao trauma e laceração do anoderma durante a evacuação. Acarreta intensa dor anal à evacuação no pósoperatório. Seu tratamento depende da sua extensão e gravidade, podendo ser clínico ou cirúrgico (por meio de uma esfincterotomia anal interna).

Estenose anal: Complicação tardia e mais comum quando se utiliza a técnica aberta, causando seu estreitamento, decorrente da fibrose cicatricial inelástica. Sua resolução é, com freqüência, cirúrgica (anoplastia).

Infecção da ferida operatória: Está relacionada aos cuidados pósoperatórios e são, com freqüência, decorrentes de má higiene local e falta de limpeza da ferida cirúrgica. Seu tratamento é clínico, por meio de banhos de assento com antisépticos, tais como, permanganato de potássio na diluição de 1:40.000, pomadas tópicas, antiinflamatórios e antibióticos.

Pós-Operatório Mediato – Dieta com fibras, analgésicos usuais ou associados a derivados da codeína, mucilaginosos ou laxativos no caso de obstipação intestinal e banhos de assento a cada 4 a 6 horas. Evitamos o uso de pomadas locais e anti-inflamatórios. Sempre recomendamos o retorno ambulatorial até a completa cicatrização da ferida operatória, assim como o tratamento do fator desencadeante da trombose hemorroidária.

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BILIARY-ENTERIC ANASTOMOSIS



Imagem

The operative conduct of the biliary-enteric anastomosis centers around three technical steps: 1) identification of healthy bile duct mucosa proximal to the site of obstruction; 2) preparation of a segment of alimentary tract, most often a Roux-en-Y jejunal limb; and 3) construction of a direct mucosa-to-mucosa anastomosis between these two. Selection of the proper anastomosis is dictated by the indication for biliary decompression and the anatomic location of the biliary obstruction. A right subcostal incision with or without an upper midline extension or left subcostal extension provides adequate exposure for construction of the biliary-enteric anastomosis. Use of retractors capable of upward elevation and cephalad retraction of the costal edges are quite valuable for optimizing visual exposure of the relevant hilar anatomy.

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Division of the ligamentum teres and mobilization of the falciform ligament off the anterior surface of the liver also facilitate operative exposure; anterocephalad retraction of the ligamentum teres and division of the bridge of tissue overlying the umbilical fissure are critical for optimal visualization of the vascular inflow and biliary drainage of segments II, III, and IV. Cholecystectomy also exposes the cystic plate, which runs in continuity with the hilar plate. Lowering of the hilar plate permits exposure of the left hepatic duct as it courses along the base of segment IVb. In cases of unilateral hepatic atrophy as a result of long-standing biliary obstruction or preoperative portal vein embolization, it is critical to understand that the normal anatomic relationships of the portal structures are altered. In the more common circumstance of  right-sided atrophy, the portal and hilar structures are rotated posteriorly and to the right; as a result, the portal vein, which is typically most posterior, is often encountered first; meticulous dissection is necessary to identify the common bile duct and hepatic duct deep within the porta hepatis.

BILIARY-ENTERIC ANASTOMOSIS_THECNICAL ASPECTS

Hérnia Inguinal – TELA PHS e UHS (Baixa Gramatura)


EVOLUÇÃO HISTÓRICA DA HERNIORRAFIA INGUINAL

As hérnias não diminuem com o tempo, muito pelo contrário – o estado de saúde do paciente só tende a piorar, aumentando o risco cirúrgico – e não existe medicação para tratá-las. Os primeiros registros do tratamento cirúrgico das hérnias abdominais datam de 1500 a.C,  mencionadas no Papiro de Ebers. Em 100 d.C.  Celso, realizando os primórdios da cirurgia convencional, extirpava o saco herniário e deixava intactos o cordão e o testículo. Já em 700 d.C. , numa conduta mais agressiva, Pablo de Egina, sacrificava o testículo. Utilizando o princípio da cauterização dos tecidos pelo calor, Albucasis em  1000 d.C., expunha o saco herniário e o cauterizava. Com o advento da técnica asséptica registra-se,  em 1869, a realização por Lister da primeira hérnia estrangulada em caráter de urgência com princípios antissépticos. O primeiro esboço de padronização da técnica operatória das hérnias abdominais ocorre a partir da publicação dos estudos de Edoardo Bassini, em 1887, primeiro estudo de reparo de hérnias com suturas. A técnica se propaga pelo mundo mas a deficiente comunicação e as múltiplas modificações levam a  resultados negativos. Já em 1940, Earle Shouldice, usando quatro planos de reforço, revoluciona a técnica com tensão, principalmente após 1950 com um melhor entendimento da anatomia, porém observam-se ainda recorrências altas, acima de 10%. Em 1967, René Stoppa e Jean Rives, utilizam a técnica pré-peritoneal com a introdução de um novo conceito: a prótese. Uma tela gigante recobrindo todos os possíveis orifícios herniários, obtendo excelente taxa de recidiva, às custas da necessidade de incisão mediana e descolamento amplo pré-peritoneal.

PADRÃO OURO

Somente em 1984 Irving Lichtenstein, por via anterior, utiliza uma tela de polipropileno. Esta técnica foi considerada uma grande evolução e passou,  nos anos 90, a ser considerado o Padrão Ouro nos reparos das hérnias inguinais possibilitando, pela primeira vez, o reparo ambulatorial com anestesia local e sedação. Com o inicio da cirurgia videolaparoscópica no início dos anos 90, desenvolveram-se diversas técnicas utilizando-se a tela pela técnica laparoscópica. Devido aos altos custos e complexidade do procedimento cirúrgico e anestésico em comparação à técnica por via aberta, estas não se estabeleceram como melhor opção. Finalmente, em 1997, Arthur  Gilbert, inicia o sistema PHS (“Prolene Hernia System”) que reúne as vantagens quanto a recidiva do reparo pré-peritoneal, a simplicidade de fixação da técnica de plug e eficácia da técnica de tela plana através de um reparo tridimensional com uma tela dupla colocada pela via anterior. Dois anos mais tarde, ocorre a publicação dos primeiros resultados do PHS – `Hernia Institute of Florida – USA, firmando o aspecto inovador e a eficácia da tela dupla, otimizando o conforto e segurança do paciente e proporcionando retorno mais precoce às atividades laborativas e utilizando facilmente anestesia local e sedação.


Lesão de Vias Biliares na Colecistectomia: Prevenção e Tratamento



A via laparoscópica tem sido reconhecida como padrão de excelência para a colecistectomias. Phillipe Mouret foi quem primeiro a realizou em 1987, mas outros procedimentos já haviam sido realizados por laparoscopia e foram descritos por ginecologistas. Desenvolvida no final da década de 80 e início dos anos 90, a videolaparoscopia mudou os conceitos de acesso cirúrgico e campo operatório, introduzindo a concepção de “cirurgia minimamente invasiva”.A colecistectomia é um dos procedimentos cirúrgicos mais realizados no mundo. Com o advento da videolaparoscopia, tornou-se uma cirurgia menos traumática, mais estética, com períodos mais curtos de internação. Em contrapartida, observou-se o aumento da incidência de lesões de via biliar extra-hepática quando comparado ao procedimento aberto, fato preocupante devido à morbidade elevada desse tipo de lesão, cuja mortalidade não é desprezível.

Apendicectomia Convencional X Laparoscópica : Existe Vantagem?

A apendicite aguda é uma doença freqüente que acomete em sua maioria homens com uma idade média ao redor de 20 anos. O seu tratamento é cirúrgico e está bem estabelecido em sua abordagem convencional. O surgimento e o desenvolvimento da videolaparoscopia abriu uma nova opção para a abordagem cirúrgica dessa patologia, permitindo uma abordagem minimamente invasiva com todas as vantagens dessa técnica.

A primeira apendicectomia videolaparoscópica foi realizada há pouco mais de 20 anos. Nessas duas décadas muito se discutiu, e ainda discute-se, a respeito deste procedimento. Mesmo encontrando com freqüência vários estudos bem realizados na literatura, ainda não há um consenso a respeito das indicações precisas para a realização da apendicectomia laparoscópica; ou mesmo sobre qual método seria superior – o convencional ou o laparoscópico. No entanto, uma revisão atual da literatura nos permite observar que os novos estudos mostram a apendicectomia laparoscópica como um procedimento seguro e eficaz, que pode ser utilizado no tratamento da apendicite complicada em qualquer faixa etária e quando o diagnóstico é duvidoso. Por estes motivos, essa opção cirúrgica está ganhando cada vez mais aceitação sendo que vários trabalhos recentes apontam-na como procedimento de escolha no tratamento da apendicite aguda.


ARTIGO DE METANÁLISE

Úlcera Péptica Perfurada: Sutura ou Ressecção?



A perfuração tem sido a complicação da úlcera péptica mais operada nos últimos anos . Devido à grande eficiência dos novos medicamentos para o tratamento clínico das úlceras gastroduodenais, a cirurgia para o tratamento dessa doença tem ficado apenas para o caso de algumas complicações, principalmente a estenose e a perfuração. Também devido ao pequeno número de gastrectomias para o tratamento das úlceras pépticas, o treinamento dos jovens cirurgiões ficou prejudicado, sendo que esses têm pouca familiaridade com o procedimento. Devido a todos esses fatores, o tratamento cirúrgico da úlcera perfurada traz grandes dilemas ao cirurgião. A úlcera aguda perfurada , isto é , aquela que não apresenta o calo fibroso ao redor da perfuração, deve ser tratada com a simples sutura da lesão. Já a úlcera crônica perfurada deve ser tratada sempre que possível pela gastrectomia. Uma revisão da literatura mostrou que, em algumas situações, é prudente se evitar a ressecção gástrica e optar pela sutura. Essas situações podem ser resumidas em: inexperiência do cirurgião na realização de gastrectomia apropriada, cavidade abdominal muito contaminada, paciente em mau estado geral em que o prolongamento do ato operatório irá piorar o quadro clínico, pacientes com mais de 60 anos, mais de 24 horas de perfuração e perfuração gástrica ou duodenal maior que 5 milímetros. A sutura tem elevadas taxas de recidiva ulcerosa (+ de 50%) e baixas taxas de mortalidade, a vagotomia associada a alguma técnica de drenagem apresenta baixa mortalidade porém a taxa de recidiva ainda é alta (10%) e, finalmente, a gastrectomia parcial tem taxa de mortalidade pouco maior que a vagotomia porém a recidiva ulcerosa é extremamente baixa (<1%). A gastrectomia parcial é o procedimento por nós preferido quando a ressecção gástrica está indicada devido à sua segurança e às baixas taxas de recidiva. Podemos concluir, portanto, que o melhor tratamento para a úlcera péptica perfurada é aquele que leva em conta o tipo de perfuração, as condições clínicas do doente, as condições locais da cavidade abdominal e a experiência do cirurgião na realização da gastrectomia.

AVALIAÇÃO PRÉ-OPERATÓRIA


MEDICINA BASEADA EM EVIDÊNCIA_AVALIAÇÃO PRÉ_OPERATÓRIA


O médico CIRURGIÃO realiza a avaliação pré-operatória e define a necessidade de avaliação complementar, considerando a otimização das condições clínicas do paciente e a realização de exames complementares. Pacientes hígidos, com idade inferior a 40 anos, sem fatores de risco detectados na anamnese e no exame físico, a serem submetidos a cirurgias de pequeno porte, após a avaliação clínica básica poderão ser encaminhados à cirurgia. Especialmente nos casos em que o paciente tenha doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, idade maior de 60 anos, estado físico ASA II ou acima, insuficiência cardíaca congestiva, dependência funcional ou cirurgia de médio ou grande porte, estará indicado avaliação pré-operatória mais pormenorizada .

Colostomia Temporária: Quando está indicada a cirurgia de reversão?

COLOSTOMIA

I. INTRODUÇÃO

Apesar de uma diminuição global nas últimas décadas do número de realizações de colostomias temporárias, esta ainda é uma técnica cirúrgica de grande importância no arsenal de opções terapêuticas do CIRURGIÃO DIGESTIVO/COLOPROCTOLOGISTA.

II. EVENTOS ADVERSOS RELACIONADOS

As colostomias, também conhecidas como ostomias, geralmente realizadas em caráter de urgência são desagradáveis para os pacientes e podem trazer uma série de eventos adversos pela sua presença, em especial o risco de infecção de parede abdominal, prolapso (saída) do intestino pela colostomia, oclusão intestinal e as hérnias (enfraquecimento da parede abdominal) para-estomais (ao redor da colostomia), variando a incidência desses eventos adversos  em até 60% dos pacientes.

III. TRATAMENTO (RECONSTRUÇÃO DO TRÂNSITO INTESTINAL)

Até o momento não se encontra consenso na literatura médica em relação ao tempo ideal de fechamento de uma colostomia temporária. O período clássico de 8 a 12 semanas, encontrado na maioria das publicações, deve ser analisado com grande senso crítico. Os trabalhos científicos especializados identificam taxas de eventos adversos relacionados a cirurgia de fechamento da colostomia ou reconstrução do trânsito intestinal extremamente variadas, com índices que vão de 10% até quase 50% dos casos.

O que podemos identificar a partir destes dados é que as cirurgias de decolostomias (cirurgia de reversão de colostomia) são cirurgias complexas e de difícil comparação entre os casos individuais em virtude da especifidade das indicações clínicas. Contudo os fatores inerentes ao próprio paciente, tais como:

1. idade (acima de 45 anos);

2. comorbidades associadas (presença de Diabetes e Hipertensão Arterial);

3. uso crônico de medicações (tais como Corticóides);

4. grau de desnutrição (Albumina sérica menor que 3,0 g/dl); e

5. doença de base que levou a cirurgia de colostomia exercem influência direta no aumento da morbidade (taxa de eventos adversos) dessas operações.

Desta forma, uma diverticulite aguda complicada, um tumor de cólon obstrutivo, uma lesão colônica por projétil de arma de fogo ou arma branca, ou ainda uma perfuração durante um exame endoscópico provocam, dependendo do paciente, respostas metabólicas e endócrinas variáveis, promovendo também efeitos diversos no processo de cicatrização das feridas no pós-operatórios. Portanto quando da programação das cirurgias de restituição do trânsito intestinal uma das avaliações clínicas de grande importância é a total recuperação do trauma cirúrgico anterior que levou a realização da colostomia que é peculiar de paciente para paciente.

IV. AVALIAÇÃO PRÉ-OPERATÓRIA

A programação do fechamento da colostomia através da cirurgia de DECOLOSTOMIA é realizada pela avaliação do estado clínico atual do paciente, assim também como a condição em que se encontram os segmentos intestinais envolvidos, que são apreciados pelos exames radiológicos contrastados (ENEMA OPACO – TRÂNSITO INTESTINAL) e  endoscópicos (COLONOSCOPIA) da porção intestinal a ser reconstruída. Outra avaliação  importante é que, do ponto de vista técnico, colostomias feitas em caráter de urgência e a presença de aderências intra-abdominais podem resultar na necessidade de ressecções adicionais de segmentos intestinais.

V. PROGNÓSTICO

Os eventos adversos mais comuns da cirurgia de reversão de colostomia são as INFECÇÕES e os VAZAMENTOS DA ANASTOMOSE (FÍSTULAS). Os resultados da cirurgia de reconstrução intestinal segundo Gomes da Silva (2010) foram : tempo operatório médio de 300 minutos (variando de 180 a 720 minutos); a reconstrução do trânsito intestinal foi alcançado em 93% dos casos; a fístula anastomótica ocorreu  em 7% e a infecção de sítio cirúrgico em 22%. A taxa de mortalidade, neste estudo foi  de 3,4% ocorrendo principalmente por sepse abdominal ocasionada pela fístula. Dentre os fatores relacionados ao insucesso na reconstrução da colostomia a Hartmann observou-se associação significativa com a tentativa prévia de reconstrução (p = 0,007), a utilização prévia de quimioterapia (p = 0,037) e o longo tempo de permanência da colostomia (p = 0,025).

Referências: Fonseca et al. ABCD, 2017. & Silva et al. ABCD, 2010.

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Mais informações: Associação Brasileira de Apoio aos Ostomizados

Eventos Adversos na Clínica Cirúrgica


EVENTOS ADVERSOS # COMPLICAÇÕES


O termo Evento Adverso (EA) cirúrgico é relativamente novo, mas o conceito de monitoramento dos resultados cirúrgicos, incluindo complicações pós-operatórias é muito antigo, havendo referência a sistemas de coleta de informações hospitalares existentes em 1732. Estatísticas vitais existem na Grã-Bretanha desde 1838. Em 1850 foi estabelecida a associação entre transmissão de infecção e a higiene da mão e em 1854 destacados os riscos aos pacientes relacionados com a má higiene nos hospitais. Em 1910, Ernest Codman apontou a necessidade de avaliação rotineira dos resultados negativos em cirurgias para a melhoria da qualidade da assistência. Nos anos 90 do século passado, continuou a expansão do interesse no campo de erros e danos relacionados com a assistência à saúde, porém com mudança no foco daspesquisas, que inicialmente buscavam estimar a frequência e natureza dos EAs em instituições e mais recentemente uma ênfase dirigida a como lidar melhor com o problema e uma crescente concordância com uma abordagem sistêmica ou organizacional.


EAs cirúrgicos contribuem significativamente para a morbidade pós-operatória, sendo sua avaliação e monitoramento frequentemente imprecisos e com validade incerta. Dada a tendência de redução do tempo de permanência hospitalar e o aumento no uso de  técnicas cirúrgicas inovadoras, especialmente minimamente invasivas e os procedimentos endoscópicos, a avaliação e o monitoramento eficiente dos eventos adversos cirúrgicos tornam-se cruciais. Alguns atributos comuns foram identificados em recente revisão de eventos adversos : EAs são desfavoráveis, indesejáveis e prejudiciais, têm impacto sobre o paciente e estão associados a um processo da assistência à saúde, mais do que a um processo natural de doenças. Estudos sobre eventos adversos têm demonstrado a complexidade de sua análise devido à variabilidade dos sistemas de registro e a extensa gama de definições na literatura científica para complicações pós-operatórias.

As complicações pós-operatórias resultam da interação de fatores dependentes do paciente, de sua enfermidade e da atenção à saúde recebida. O estudo dos EAs cirúrgicos tem especial relevância por sua frequência, porque em parte são atribuíveis a deficiências na atenção à saúde, pelo impacto considerável sobre a saúde dos pacientes, pela repercussão econômica no gasto social e sanitário e por constituir um instrumento de avaliação da qualidade da assistência. Os eventos adversos de maior interesse à saúde pública são os evitáveis, suscetíveis a intervenções dirigidas à sua prevenção. Os eventos adversos cirúrgicos estão relacionados com acidentes intra-operatórios cirúrgicos ou anestésicos, com complicações pós-operatórias imediatas ou tardias e com o fracasso da intervenção cirúrgica.

Os EAs cirúrgicos foram objeto de estudos realizados nos EUA , Austrália e Espanha . No estudo sobre EAs cirúrgicos em hospitais de Colorado e Utah (EUA) foi calculada a taxa de incidência de 1,9% para o total de pacientes internados. Dentre os pacientes submetidos à cirurgia e nos casos de parto a taxa de incidência de EAs cirúrgicos foi de 3,0%, sendo 54% considerados evitáveis. Foi estimado que 5,6% dos EAs cirúrgicos resultaram em óbito. No estudo para determinar a taxa de EAs em pacientes cirúrgicos na Austrália , a prevalência de internações cirúrgicas associadas com um EA foi calculada em 21,9%. Quanto à prevenção, foram classificados como altamente evitáveis 47,6% dos EAs, pouco evitáveis 31,4% e 20,8% não evitáveis.

Foi realizado um estudo para descrever os eventos adversos em cirurgias de parede abdominal e analisar as associações entre os resultados e determinadas características dospacientes, em um serviço de cirurgia geral em Valencia, Espanha . Complicações foram identificadas em 16,32% dos pacientes. A relevância da questão da segurança em cirurgia no Brasil pode ser evidenciada pelos resultados do estudo de Mendes et al. (2009) , especialmente se considerarmos o volume de internações relacionadas com cirurgia ocorridas no país no ano de 2003, cerca de três milhões, ano de referência do estudo mencionado . Além disso, poucos hospitais brasileiros cumprem a legislação sanitária para o licenciamento de estabelecimentos hospitalares.

Dados oriundos do Conselho Regional de Medicina do Estado de São Paulo, referentes à inspeção de 743 hospitais realizadas no ano de 2003, demonstram que 52,5% apresentaram condições físicas inadequadas, em desacordo com a legislação sanitária. Deve ainda ser destacado que os hospitais de pequeno porte, ou seja, com até cinquenta leitos, representam 62% dos estabelecimentos hospitalares e 18% dos leitos existentes no sistema de saúde brasileiro. Esses hospitais estão distribuídos principalmente em municípios de pequeno porte interioranos, são de baixa complexidade e densidade tecnológica, apresentam taxa de ocupação baixa (32,8%) e 89% possuem sala de cirurgia.

COLECISTITE AGUDA



I. INTRODUÇÃO 

Os cálculos de vesícula (COLELITÍASE) estão presentes em mais de 10% da população ocidental e esta incidência aumenta com a idade. A colelitíase é a doença do aparelho digestivo com maior número de  indicação cirúrgica. Anualmente, cerca de 200.000 colecistectomias são realizadas nos Brasil. Os fatores de risco para o surgimento dos cálculos são: obesidade, diabetes mellitus, uso de estrogênio, gravidez, doença hemolítica, hereditariedade e cirrose. Acomete principalmente as mulheres na idade reprodutiva.

São várias as complicações da colelitíase, entre elas:

1. COLECISTITE AGUDA

2. PANCREATITE AGUDA

3. COLEDOCOLITÍASE

4. FÍSTULAS INTERNAS

5. CÂNCER DA VESÍCULA

VEJA AQUI ONDE REALIZAR A CIRURGIA DE COLECISTECTOMIA COM CIRURGIÃO DO APARELHO DIGESTIVO

II. FISIOPATOLOGIA

A colecistite aguda é uma doença comum em emergências em todo o mundo. Na maioria dos casos, é causada pela inflamação da parede da vesícula secundária à impactação de um cálculo no ducto cístico obstruindo-o, o que causa uma crise repentina de dor abdominal, conhecido como ABDOME AGUDO.

Colecistite litiásica

A colecistite aguda está associada à colelitíase em mais de 90% dos casos. O quadro ocorre devido à obstrução do ducto cístico por um cálculo. Se a obstrução continua, a vesícula se distende e suas paredes tornam-se edematosas. O processo inflamatório inicia-se com espessamento da parede, eritema e hemorragia subserosa. Surgem hiperemia e áreas focais de necrose. Na maioria dos casos, o cálculo se desloca e o processo inflamatório regride. Se o cálculo não se move, o quadro evolui para isquemia e necrose da parede da vesícula em cerca de 10% dos casos. A formação de abscesso e empiema dentro da vesícula é conhecida como colecistite aguda gangrenosa. Com a infecção bacteriana secundária, principalmente por anaeróbios, há formação de gás que pode ocorrer dentro ou na parede da vesícula. Esse é um quadro mais grave conhecido com colecistite enfisematosa.

Colecistite aguda alitiásica 

A colecistite aguda também pode ocorrer sem a presença de cálculos em cerca de 5% dos casos. Tem uma evolução mais rápida e frequentemente evolui para gangrena, empiema ou perfuração. Ocorre em pessoas idosas ou em estado crítico após trauma, queimaduras, nutrição parenteral de longa data, cirurgias extensas, sepses, ventilação com pressão positiva e a terapia com opioides também parece estar envolvida. A etiologia é confusa, mas a estase, a isquemia, a injúria por reperfusão e os efeitos dos mediadores pró-inflamatórios eicosanoides são apontados como causas.

VEJA AQUI ONDE REALIZAR A CIRURGIA DE COLECISTECTOMIA COM CIRURGIÃO DO APARELHO DIGESTIVO

III. QUADRO CLÍNICO

O quadro se inicia com uma cólica biliar caracterizada como dor no hipocôndrio direito com irradiação para escápula direita e região epigástrica. Como sintoma mais comum, o paciente apresenta dor e pressão no hipocôndrio direito, mais duradoura das que nas crises de cólica biliar a que ele frequentemente se refere. Esse é o primeiro sinal de inflamação da vesícula. A dor pode intensificar-se quando a pessoa respira profundamente e muitas vezes estende-se à parte inferior da escápula direita e à região epigástrica. A febre, assim como náuseas e vômitos, que podem ser biliosos, são habituais em 70% dos pacientes. A febre alta, os calafrios e a distensão abdominal com diminuição da peristalse costumam indicar a formação de um abscesso, gangrena ou perfuração da vesícula biliar. Nestas condições, torna-se necessária a cirurgia de urgência. A icterícia pode indicar coledocolitíase ou compressão externa do colédoco pela vesícula inflamada.

IV. AVALIAÇÃO DIAGNÓSTICA

O hemograma habitualmente apresenta leucocitose com desvio para esquerda. O hepatograma está alterado com elevação das transaminases, da fosfatase alcalina, bilirrubinas e amilase. A hiperbilirrubinemia pode ser devido à compressão extrínseca pelo processo inflamatório grave, pela coledocolitíase ou pela síndrome de Mirizzi, que é causada pela impactação de um cálculo no infundíbulo que pode fistulizar para o colédoco e obstruí-lo. A hiperamilasemia pode ocorrer devido à obstrução do ducto pancreático levando à pancreatite concomitante.

A ultrassonografia é o exame inicial e permite a identificação de alterações que não são visíveis no exame físico e permite uma classificação. É considerado o exame “ouro” nesses casos. Tem alta sensibilidade para a detecção de cálculos e o espessamento da parede que é considerado anormal quando maior que 4 mm . Também pode haver visualização de líquido perivesicular, distensão da vesícula, cálculos impactados no infundíbulo e o sinal de Murphy ultrassonográfico. Este sinal é relatado quando, após a identificação da vesícula inflamada, o ultrassonografista comprime o abdômen na topografia da mesma com o transdutor e o paciente refere dor intensa. A ultrassonografia laparoscópica intraoperatória tem sido usada no lugar da colangiografia no diagnóstico da coledocolitíase.

VEJA AQUI ONDE REALIZAR A CIRURGIA DE COLECISTECTOMIA COM CIRURGIÃO DO APARELHO DIGESTIVO
V. TRATAMENTO

A colecistectomia (retirada cirúrgica da vesícula biliar) é o tratamento definitivo dos pacientes com colelitíase associada à colecistite aguda. Em geral, após sua hospitalização e preparo pré-operatório (hidratação, analgésicos e antibióticos)  realiza-se a cirurgia nas primeiras 72 horas de início do quadro. A colecistectomia videolaparoscópica é o tratamento de escolha na colecistite aguda litiásica e alitiásica. A cirurgia videolaparoscópica tem como característica básica diminuir a agressão e consequente trauma cirúrgico. Tem sido demonstrada, nesta abordagem, uma menor repercussão orgânica, representada por menor reação metabólica, inflamatória e imunológica quando comparada a uma cirurgia aberta. Isto representa um grande benefício para o paciente, principalmente àqueles mais graves, já com comprometimento de órgãos e sistemas, mesmo nos pacientes com idade avançada. A taxa de conversão de cirurgia videolaparoscópica para cirurgia aberta é maior nos casos de colecistopatia calculosa aguda do que na crônica, podendo ocorrer até em 30% dos casos. O fator que mais dificulta a realização do procedimento videolaparoscópico é a alteração anatômica ou se não há uma adequada visualização das estruturas. A colecistite aguda associada ao sexo masculino, IMC > 30, idade superior a 60 anos, cirurgia abdominal prévia, ASA elevado, espessamento da vesícula maior que 4 mm e diabetes são considerados fatores de risco para a conversão para a cirurgia aberta.

VI. CONCLUSÃO 

A colecistite aguda continua sendo uma doença com a qual o cirugião se depara frequentemente. A cirurgia videolaparoscópica veio mudar o manuseio e evolução dos pacientes tornando o pós-operatório mais curto e menos doloroso. A literatura médica tem levado alguns cirurgiões a retardarem a indicação cirúrgica, entretanto novos trabalhos, inclusive com análise de medicina baseada em evidências, têm demonstrado que a intervenção na primeira semana do início do quadro é a melhor conduta.

VEJA AQUI ONDE REALIZAR A CIRURGIA DE COLECISTECTOMIA COM CIRURGIÃO DO APARELHO DIGESTIVO
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