Arquivos Mensais: setembro \28\UTC 2013

Lymph Node Dissection in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

LINFATICOS GASTRICOS

Extent of lymph node dissection has been an area of controversy in gastric adenocarcinoma for many years. Some surgeons believe that cancer metastasizes through a stepwise progression, and an extensive lymphadenectomy is necessary to improve survival and/or cure the patient. Other physicians argue that extensive ly-mphadenectomies only add pe-rioperative morbidity and mor-tality and do not improve survival. Asian countries have been performing extended lymphadenectomies routinely for many years with promising survival data, although Western countries have not been able to reproduce those results. Much of the controversy surrounding lymphadenectomies started in the 1980s when Japanese studies reported superior survival rates matched stage for stage, compared to the United States. This was theorized to be secondary to the more extensive lymphadenectomy performed in Japan compared to the United States

Resultado de imagem para gastric cancer linfadenectomy d2

A United Kingdom study randomized 400 patients to either a D1 or a D2 lymph node dissection. Those patients with tumors in the upper or middle third of the stomach underwent a distal pancreaticosplenectomy to obtain retropancreatic and splenic hilar nodes. While the 5-year survival rates were not statistically significant between the two groups, on multivariate analyses it was noted that those patients in the D2 group that did not undergo the distal pancreaticosplenectomy had an increased survival compared with the D1 group. A trial in the Netherlands randomized 380 gastric cancer patients to a D1 lymphadenectomy and 331 patients to a D2 lymphadenectomy. Similar to the United Kingdom study, there was not a significant difference in survival between the two groups, even when followed out to 11 years. There was a significant increase in postoperative complications in the D2 group compared with the D1 group (43 % vs. 25 %, respectively) as well as mortality (10 % vs. 4 %, respectively).

The data from these two studies suggest that a pancreaticosplenectomy performed to harvest lymph nodes seems to only add morbidity and mortality while not improving survival. One concern raised about the prior two studies was the variation in surgical technique and lack of standardization of surgeon experience. A Taiwanese study accounted for this by performing the study at a single institution with three surgeons, each of whom had completed at least 25 D3 lymph node dissections prior to the study. Patients with gastric cancer were randomized to a D1 lymph node dissection (defined as resection of perigastric lymph nodes along the lesser and greater curves of the stomach) or a D3 lymph node dissection (defined as resection of additional lymph nodes surrounding the splenic, common hepatic, left gastric arteries, nodes in the hepatoduodenal ligament, and retropancreatic lymph nodes). There was an overall 5-year survival benefit with the D3 group of 60 % compared with the D1 group of 54 %. A Japanese study evaluated a more aggressive lymph node dissection and randomized patients to a D2 dissection or a para-aortic lymph node dissection (PAND). There was no significant difference in 5-year survival between the two groups with a trend toward an increase in complications in the PAND group. Multiple studies have shown that the number of positive lymph nodes is a significant predictor of survival. Current AJCC guidelines stipulate that at least 15 lymph nodes are needed for pathologic examination to obtain adequate staging.

Laparoscopic techniques have become an integral part of surgical practice over the past several decades. For gastric cancer, multiple retrospective studies have reported the advantages of laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) over open gastrectomy (OG). A recent meta-analysis of 15 nonrandomized comparative studies has also shown that although LG had a longer operative time than OG, it was associated with lower intraoperative blood loss, overall complication rate, fewer wound-related complications, quicker recovery of gastrointestinal motility with shorter time to first flatus and oral intake, and shorter hospital stayA randomized prospective trial comparing laparoscopic assisted with open subtotal gastrectomy reported that LG had a significantly lower blood loss (229 ± 144 ml versus 391 ± 136 ml; P< 0.001), shorter time to resumption of oral intake (5.1 ± 0.5 days versus 7.4 ± 2 days; P< 0.001), and earlier discharge from hospital (10.3 ± 3.6 days versus 14.5 ± 4.6 days; P< 0.001). 

Como funciona o GRAMPEADOR INTESTINAL (SUTURAS MECÂNICAS) ?


O objetivo do cirurgião ao realizar qualquer intervenção é que esta seja segura e eficiente. O procedimento deve ser o mais rápido possível, com o menor trauma tecidual, restaurando a função, e conseqüentemente diminuindo ao máximo as possibilidades de intercorrências no pós-operatório. A moderna cirurgia atinge estes objetivos de forma bastante satisfatória, porém, as complicações relacionadas às suturas ainda ocorrem com alguma freqüência. Foi somente no final do século XIX, que as suturas gastrointestinais adquiriram confiabilidade, com o conhecimento básico dos princípios da cicatrização dos tecidos. Os fatores envolvidos no reparo tecidual relacionam-se não só à técnica, mas também ao paciente individualmente, e à área a ser operada. A presença de isquemia, edema, infecção e desnutrição são alguns dos elementos que retardam e prejudicam a cicatrização. A variação na habilidade dos cirurgiões serviu de motivação para o desenvolvimento de dispositivos, que superando as diferenças individuais, permitissem que as técnicas fossem executadas adequadamente, e cujo resultado final fosse o melhor possível. Toda técnica deve ser reproduzida de forma confiável pelo maior número de cirurgiões para que seus resultados sejam adotados e reconhecidos como eficazes.

ANASTOMOSE GASTROINTESTINAL COM GRAMPEADORES

TREATMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE ILEUS

POSTOPERATIVE ILEUS_REVIEW ARTICLE


ALVIMOPANIn systems that try to minimize hospital stay after abdominal surgery, one of the principal limiting factors is the recovery of adequate bowel function, which can delay discharge or lead to readmission. Postoperative ileus (POI) is the term given to the cessation of intestinal function following surgery. Although all surgical procedures put the patient at risk for POI, gastrointestinal tract surgeries in particular are associated with a temporary cessation of intestinal function. The duration of POI varies, lasting from a few hours to several weeks. Prolonged postoperative ileus, also known as pathologic postoperative ileus, can be caused by a myriad of pathologic processes that are treated with limited success by clinical and pharmacologic management. Studies of large administrative databases show that, on average, patients with a diagnosis of POI stay 5 days longer in hospital after abdominal surgery than patients without POI.  Over the last decade, substantial efforts have been made to minimize the duration of POI, as there appears to be no associated physiologic benefit, and it is currently the primary factor delaying recovery for most patients. In this review, we define POI, describe the pathogenesis and briefly discuss clinical management before detailing current pharmacologic management options.

Colonoscopia : Quais as principais complicações?


Colonoscopy is a commonly performed procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of conditions and symptoms and for the screening and surveillance of colorectal neoplasia. Although up to 33% of patients report at least one minor, transient GI symptom after colonoscopy, serious complications are uncommon. In a 2008 systematic review of 12 studies totaling 57,742 colonoscopies performed for average risk screening, the pooled overall serious adverse event rate was 2.8 per 1000 procedures. The risk of some complications may be higher if the colonoscopy is performed for an indication other than screening. The colorectal cancer miss rate of colonoscopy has been reported to be as high as 6% and the miss rate for adenomas larger than 1 cm is 12% to 17%. Although missed lesions are considered a poor outcome of colonoscopy, they are not a complication of the procedure per se and will not be discussed further in this document. Over 85% of the serious colonoscopy complications are reported in patients undergoing colonoscopy with polypectomy. An analysis of Canadian administrative data, including over 97,000 colonoscopies, found that polypectomy was associated with a 7-fold increase in the risk of bleeding or perforation. However, complication data are often not stratified by whether or not polypectomy was performed. Therefore, complications of polypectomy are discussed with those of diagnostic colonoscopy. A discussion of the diagnosis and management of all complications of colonoscopy is beyond the scope of this document, although general principles are reviewed.


COLONOSCOPIA E SUAS COMPLICAÇÕES_ARTIGO DE REVISÃO

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